1. Steven J. Matcher

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    1. Mentioned In 74 Articles

    2. Attenuation of stripe artifacts in optical coherence tomography images through wavelet-FFT filtering

      Attenuation of stripe artifacts in optical coherence tomography images through wavelet-FFT filtering
      The use of polarization-maintaining (PM) fibers for polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) can result in numerous image artifacts which degrade the reliability of birefringence measurements. Similar artifacts can also arise in conventional OCT, due to stray reflections from optical surfaces, a problem which is increasing in tandem with the steady rise in source coherence lengths. Here, a recently presented wavelet-FFT filter[Opt. Express 17 (10), 8567 (2009). [ PubMed ] ] is combined ...
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    3. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography with a conical beam scan for the investigation of birefringence and collagen alignment in the human cervix

      Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography with a conical beam scan for the investigation of birefringence and collagen alignment in the human cervix
      ...ive OCT,” J. Biophotonics 2(6-7), 426–434 (2009). [Crossref] [PubMed] N. Ugryumova, J. Jacobs, M. Bonesi, and S. J. Matcher, “Novel optical imaging technique to determine the 3-D orientation of collagen fibers in cartila...
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    4. Superparamagnetic graphene quantum dot as a dual‐modality contrast agent for confocal fluorescence microscopy and magnetomotive optical coherence tomography

      Superparamagnetic graphene quantum dot as a dual‐modality contrast agent for confocal fluorescence microscopy and magnetomotive optical coherence tomography
      A magnetic graphene quantum dot (MGQD) nanoparticle, synthesized by hydrothermally reducing and cutting graphene oxide‐iron oxide sheet, was demonstrated to possess the capabilities of simultaneous confocal fluorescence and magnetomotive optical coherence tomography (MMOCT) imaging. This MGQD shows low toxicity, significant tunable blue fluorescence and superparamagnetism, which can thus be used as a dual‐modality contrast agent for confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and MMOCT. The feasibility of applying MGQD as ...
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    5. Sub-clinical assessment of atopic dermatitis severity using angiographic optical coherence tomography

      Sub-clinical assessment of atopic dermatitis severity using angiographic optical coherence tomography
      Measurement of sub-clinical atopic dermatitis (AD) is important for determining how long therapies should be continued after clinical clearance of visible AD lesions. An important biomarker of subclinical AD is epidermal hypertrophy, the structural measures of which often make optical coherence tomography (OCT) challenging due to the lack of a clearly delineated dermal-epidermal junction in AD patients. Alternatively, angiographic OCT measurements of vascular depth and morphology may represent a robust ...
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    6. Vascular patterning of subcutaneous mouse fibrosarcomas expressing individual VEGF isoforms can be differentiated using angiographic optical coherence tomography

      Vascular patterning of subcutaneous mouse fibrosarcomas expressing individual VEGF isoforms can be differentiated using angiographic optical coherence tomography
      Subcutaneously implanted experimental tumors in mice are commonly used in cancer research. Despite their superficial location, they remain a challenge to image non-invasively at sufficient spatial resolution for microvascular studies. Here we evaluate the capabilities of optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography for imaging such tumors directly through the murine skin in-vivo. Data sets were collected from mouse tumors derived from fibrosarcoma cells genetically engineered to express only single splice variant ...
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    7. New Non-invasive Techniques to Quantify Skin Surface Strain and Sub-surface Layer Deformation of Finger-pad during Sliding

      New Non-invasive Techniques to Quantify Skin Surface Strain and Sub-surface Layer Deformation of Finger-pad during Sliding
      tudies on the variation of skin properties with gender, age and anatomical region, with regards to interaction with different materials have resulted in significant research output. Investigations on skin surface strain and sub-surface layer deformation during sliding, however, have not received as much attention. This novel study uses two non-invasive techniques, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and digital image correlation (DIC), to measure properties of the index finger of a 25 ...
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    8. Measuring contact area in a sliding human finger-pad contact

      Measuring contact area in a sliding human finger-pad contact
      Background/Purpose The work outlined in this paper was aimed at achieving further understanding of skin frictional behaviour by investigating the contact area between human finger-pads and flat surfaces. Methods Both the static and the dynamic contact areas (in macro- and micro-scales) were measured using various techniques, including ink printing, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and Digital Image Correlation (DIC). Results In the studies of the static measurements using ink printing ...
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    9. Investigation into surface interaction between the contact lens, the upper eyelid and cornea using optical coherence tomography

      Investigation into surface interaction between the contact lens, the upper eyelid and cornea using optical coherence tomography
      Background and Aim: Over 50% of the total 125 million contact lens users complain of discomforts due to contact lenses. The aim of the project is to understand the effect of contact lenses on the morphological parameters of cornea and eyelid surfaces. Methods and results: Five volunteers were recruited for this study (3 soft contact lens users and 2 non-users). The volunteers were imaged using a slit lamp and Optical ...
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    10. Characterizing the microcirculation of atopic dermatitis using angiographic optical coherence tomography

      Characterizing the microcirculation of atopic dermatitis using angiographic optical coherence tomography
      Background and Aim: With inflammatory skin conditions such as atopic dermatitis (AD), epidermal thickness is mediated by both pathological hyperplasia and atrophy such as that resulting from corticosteroid treatment. Such changes are likely to influence the depth and shape of the underlying microcirculation. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides a non-invasive view into the tissue, however structural measures of epidermal thickness are made challenging due to the lack of a delineated ...
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    11. In vivo measurement of skin surface strain and sub-surface layer deformation induced by natural tissue stretching

      In vivo measurement of skin surface strain and sub-surface layer deformation induced by natural tissue stretching
      Stratum corneum and epidermal layers change in terms of thickness and roughness with gender, age and anatomical site. Knowledge of the mechanical and tribological properties of skin associated with these structural changes are needed to aid in the design of exoskeletons, prostheses, orthotics, body mounted sensors used for kinematics measurements and in optimum use of wearable on-body devices. In this case study, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and digital image correlation ...
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    12. Towards in-situ process monitoring in selective laser sintering using optical coherence tomography

      Towards in-situ process monitoring in selective laser sintering using optical coherence tomography
      Selective laser sintering (SLS) enables fast, flexible and cost-efficient production of parts directly from 3D CAD data. However, compared with more established machine tools, there is a marked lack of process monitoring and feedback control of key process variables to optimize production parameters in-situ. We apply optical coherence tomography (OCT) to evaluate components produced by SLS and suggest a route for its application in in-situ process monitoring within the SLS ...
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    13. Skin surface and sub-surface strain and deformation imaging using optical coherence tomography and digital image correlation

      Skin surface and sub-surface strain and deformation imaging using optical coherence tomography and digital image correlation
      Bio-mechanical properties of the human skin deformed by external forces at difference skin/material interfaces attract much attention in medical research. For instance, such properties are important design factors when one designs a healthcare device, i.e., the device might be applied directly at skin/device interfaces. In this paper, we investigated the bio-mechanical properties, i.e., surface strain, morphological changes of the skin layers, etc., of the human finger-pad ...
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    14. Optical coherence elastography for human finger-pad skin deformation studies

      Optical coherence elastography for human finger-pad skin deformation studies
      An optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with an A-scan rate of 20 kHz was developed for measuring the biomechanical properties of human finger-pad skin. Such an OCT system operates at a center wavelength of 890 nm with a spectral bandwidth of 150 nm resulting in a very good axial resolution of 2.6 m. The measured sensitivity and sensitivity roll-off of the system were ~93 dB and ~6 dB mm ...
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    15. High-resolution label-free vascular imaging using a commercial, clinically approved dermatological OCT scanner

      High-resolution label-free vascular imaging using a commercial, clinically approved dermatological OCT scanner
      Background and Aim: Recently developed decorrelative techniques such as speckle-variance optical coherence tomography (svOCT) have demonstrated non-invasive depth-resolved imaging of the microcirculation in-vivo. However, bulk tissue motion (BTM) originating from the subject's breathing or heartbeat remains problematic at low imaging speeds, often resulting in full frame decorrelation and a loss of vascular contrast. The aim of this study was to build upon existing svOCT techniques through utilisation of a ...
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  2. About Steven J. Matcher

    Steven J. Matcher

    Stephen Matcher graduated from Imperial College London with a BSc in Physics and subsequently a PhD in optical astronomy, where he used high-speed, low-light-level imaging to overcome atmospheric turbulence and achieve diffraction-limited ground-based imaging. He translated his expertise in low-light-level imaging into medicine at University College London, where he developed near-infrared spectroscopy techniques to study tissue oxygen delivery, especially in newborn infants at risk from birth asphyxia. He then joined the staff of the Physics department at the University of Exeter, where he established research programmes in visible light spectroscopy of skin and optical coherence tomography (OCT). In 2006 he joined the University of Sheffield where he is currently Reader in Biomedical Engineering. His chief research interest lies in the development and application of novel biophotonic imaging tools to aid the characterisation of native and engineered biological tissues. Primarily he works with OCT, including novel variants such as polarization-sensitive OCT for the non-invasive assessment of collagen organization and Doppler OCT for the measurement of fluid flow. He is currently collaborating with clinical colleagues to improve the detection of corneal stem cells post-implantation, to provide tools for the early detection and staging of epithelial cancer and to develop non-invasive tools to characterise skin barrier function. He also actively collaborates with the National Centre for III-V Technologies to develop improved light sources for biophotonic imaging.

  3. Quotes

    1. I am very pleased that the RAE is supporting my secondment to Michelson Diagnostics, a world leader in OCT imaging and I hope that my skills and expertise will be of practical benefit to the company
      In Dr Stephen Matcher Biomedical Imaging Expert Seconded to Michelson Diagnostics