1. Stanford University

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    1. Mentioned In 111 Articles

    2. Photonics innovations win R&D 100 Awards

      Photonics innovations win R&D 100 Awards

      Super-resolution microscopes from Carl Zeiss and Leica Microsystems, a novel radiation detector from Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), and an origami microscope are among more than a dozen optics and photonics innovations to win one of this year's R&D 100 Awards. Intended to recognize the 100 "most technologically significant products" introduced over the past year, the list also includes an all-fiber isolator from AdValue Photonics, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) diagnostic endoscope developed by NinePoint Medical, and a lunar laser communication system co-developed by NASA and MIT's Lincoln Laboratory.

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    3. Automated mosaicing of feature-poor optical coherence tomography volumes with an integrated white light imaging system

      Automated mosaicing of feature-poor optical coherence tomography volumes with an integrated white light imaging system

      We demonstrate the first automated , volumetric mosaicing algorithm for optical coherence tomography (OCT) that both accommodates 6-DOF rigid transformations and implements a bundle adjustment step amenable to generating large fields of view with endoscopic and freehand imaging systems . Our mosaicing algorithm exploits the known, rigid connection between a combined white light and OCT imaging system to reduce the computational complexity of traditional volumetric mosaicing pipelines. Specifically, the search for 3D point correspondences is replaced by two, 2D processing steps: we first co-register a pair of white light images in 2D and then generate a surface map based on the volumetric ...

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    4. Three-dimensional, distendable bladder phantom for optical coherence tomography and white light cystoscopy

      Three-dimensional, distendable bladder phantom for optical coherence tomography and white light cystoscopy

      We describe a combination of fabrication techniques and a general process to construct a three-dimensional (3-D) phantom that mimics the size, macroscale structure, microscale surface topology, subsurface microstructure, optical properties, and functional characteristics of a cancerous bladder. The phantom also includes features that are recognizable in white light (i.e., the visual appearance of blood vessels), making it suitable to emulate the bladder for emerging white light + optical coherence tomography (OCT) cystoscopies and other endoscopic procedures of large, irregularly shaped organs. The fabrication process has broad applicability and can be generalized to OCT phantoms for other tissue types or phantoms ...

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    5. Volumetric mosaicing for optical coherence tomography for large area bladder wall visualization

      Volumetric mosaicing for optical coherence tomography for large area bladder wall visualization

      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has shown potential as a complementary imaging modality to white light cystoscopy (WLC) because it can visualize sub-surface details of the bladder wall, enabling it to stage early cancers and visualize tumors undetectable to WLC. However, the inherently small field of view (FOV) of OCT compared with the area of the bladder wall restricts its clinical utility. A large OCT FOV could improve surgical planning by enabling complete visualization of tumor margins or could aid in early cancer detection by tracking the appearance of the bladder wall over time. To overcome the limited FOV of OCT ...

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    6. Multilayered disease-mimicking bladder phantom with realistic surface topology for optical coherence tomography

      Multilayered disease-mimicking bladder phantom with realistic surface topology for optical coherence tomography

      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has shown potential as a complementary modality to white light cystoscopy (WLC), the gold standard for imaging bladder cancer. OCT can visualize sub-surface details of the bladder wall, which enables it to stage cancers and detect tumors that are otherwise invisible to WLC. Currently, OCT systems have too slow a speed and too small a field of view for comprehensive bladder imaging, which limits its clinical utility. Validation and feasibility testing of technological refinements aimed to provide faster imaging and wider fields of view necessitates a realistic bladder phantom. We present a novel process to fabricate ...

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    7. Evaluation of fingerprint deformation using optical coherence tomography

      Evaluation of fingerprint deformation using optical coherence tomography

      Biometric identification systems have important applications to privacy and security. The most widely used of these, print identification, is based on imaging patterns present in the fingers, hands and feet that are formed by the ridges, valleys and pores of the skin. Most modern print sensors acquire images of the finger when pressed against a sensor surface. Unfortunately, this pressure may result in deformations, characterized by changes in the sizes and relative distances of the print patterns, and such changes have been shown to negatively affect the performance of fingerprint identification algorithms. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel imaging ...

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  2. About Stanford University

    Stanford University

    Stanford University was founded in 1891 by Leland and Jane Stanford to "promote the public welfare by exercising an influence on behalf of humanity and civilization." More than a century later, Stanford remains dedicated to finding solutions to the great challenges of the day and to preparing our students for leadership in today's complex world.