1. Shigenobu Inami

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    1. Mentioned In 15 Articles

    2. Target lesion evaluation by multiple modalities in vivo: near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), virtual histology intravascular ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, and angioscopy

      Target lesion evaluation by multiple modalities in vivo: near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), virtual histology intravascular ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, and angioscopy
      A 60-year-old man presented with ischaemic heart failure. We conducted coronary angiography (CAG) after improvement of the heart failure. On CAG, there was a hazy stenosis in the proximal left anterior descending artery (Figure 1, Moving image 1) . The lesion was observed by four modalities: near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), virtual histology intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and angioscopy. NIRS detected lipid core plaque with echolucency on greyscale IVUS. VH-IVUS ...
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    3. Relationship between cholesterol crystals and culprit lesion characteristics in patients with stable coronary artery disease: an optical coherence tomography study

      Relationship between cholesterol crystals and culprit lesion characteristics in patients with stable coronary artery disease: an optical coherence tomography study
      Aims Some recent studies have reported the role of cholesterol crystals (ChCs) in plaque rupture in patients with coronary artery disease. We used optical coherence tomography (OCT) to investigate the characteristics of coronary plaques that were associated with derived ChCs. Methods We evaluated 101 subjects with stable coronary artery disease who underwent OCT. We compared the OCT findings of the culprit lesions with ChCs to those without ChCs and investigated ...
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    4. Clear view, clear benefit (editorial)

      Clear view, clear benefit (editorial)
      In this issue of the Journal, a clinical investigation by Ozaki et al focuses on the flushing solution used for image acquisition with frequency-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). 1 The authors present the cross-sectional area measurement as a quantitative evaluation using low-molecular dextran L (LMD-L) approximate to that of contrast media, and the non-inferiority of LMD-L to contrast media with regard to FD-OCT image quality. Although the cross-sectional and longitudinal ...
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    5. Optical coherence tomography analysis for restenosis of drug-eluting stents

      Optical coherence tomography analysis for restenosis of drug-eluting stents
      Although drug-eluting stents (DES) dramatically reduce the risk of in-stent restenosis (ISR) in comparison to bare-metal stents (BMS) , DES ISR still remains at 5 to 10% in real-world . According to pathological researches, BMS ISR is mainly composed of proliferating smooth muscle cells (SMC). A recent study showed lower effectiveness of DES for target lesion revascularization (TLR) of DES ISR than that of BMS ISR . Therefore, a hypothesis that tissues constituting ...
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    6. Impact of small thrombus formation in restenotic bare-metal stent lesions associated with acute coronary syndrome: Identification by optical coherence tomography

      Abstract: Background: Although in-stent restenosis (ISR) after bare-metal stent (BMS) implantation is considered to be clinically benign, ISR is often associated with adverse complications, such as acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The frequency, type, and location of thrombi in ISR lesions and their clinical presentation have not yet been precisely validated.Methods: Thirty angiographic ISR lesions occurring within 3 to 8months after stenting were evaluated by optical coherence tomography (OCT). A ...
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    7. Appearance of Lipid-Laden Intima and Neovascularization After Implantation of Bare-Metal Stents: Extended Late-Phase Observation by Intracoronary Optical Coherence Tomography

      ...tima contributes to atherosclerotic progression of neointima. Masamichi Takano, MD*,*, Masanori Yamamoto, MD, Shigenobu Inami, MD*, Daisuke Murakami, MD, Takayoshi Ohba, MD, Yoshihiko Seino, MD and Kyoichi Mizuno, MD* * ...
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    8. Advanced Neointimal Growth is Not Associated With a Low Risk of In-Stent Thrombus: Optical Coherence Tomographic Findings After

      Advanced Neointimal Growth is Not Associated With a Low Risk of In-Stent Thrombus: Optical Coherence Tomographic Findings After
      Background: There is a hypothesis that advanced neointimal stent coverage may protect against stent thrombosis. In the present study, differences in neointimal growth and prevalence of in-stent thrombus between paclitaxel- and sirolimus-eluting stent (PES and SES) were evaluated by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods and Results: Follow-up angiographic and OCT examinations at approximately 6 months were performed for 40 patients (20 PES, 20 SES). Late loss was measured by quantitative ...
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    9. Delayed Endothelialization After Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Stent Implantation for Coronary Aneurysm

      A polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stent is specially used to treat coronary perforation complicating percutaneous intervention in order to prevent the aneurysm from rupturing, but until now it has not been known if endothelialization occurs inside this type of stent. A patient with a giant aneurysm of the right coronary artery underwent successful implantation of a PTFE-covered stent. Angiography at 9-month follow-up showed focal restenosis at the proximal edge of the ...
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    10. Novel neointimal formation over sirolimus-eluting stents identified by coronary angioscopy and optical coherence tomography

      Novel neointimal formation over sirolimus-eluting stents identified by coronary angioscopy and optical coherence tomography
      eointimal proliferation after sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) implantation is generally inhibited by the pharmacological effects of sirolimus in comparison to bare metal stent (BMS). Neointimal hyperplasia after BMS implantation is mainly composed of vascular smooth muscle cells, and is usually observed as a white mass by angioscopy and as a layer of uniform signal intensity without attenuation on optical coherence tomography (OCT). In this case, angioscopic color of the neointima covering ...
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    11. Comparison of Neointimal Coverage by Optical Coherence Tomography of a Sirolimus-Eluting Stent Versus a Bare-Metal Stent Three Months After Implantation

      No detailed data regarding neointimal coverage of bare-metal stents (BMSs) at 3 months after implantation was reported to date. This investigation was designed to evaluate the neointimal coverage of BMSs compared with sirolimus-eluting stents (SESs) using optical coherence tomography. A prospective optical coherence tomographic follow-up examination was performed 3 months after stent implantation for patients who underwent BMS (n = 16) or SES implantation (n = 24). Neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) thickness on ...
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    12. In Vivo Comparison of Optical Coherence Tomography and Angioscopy for the Evaluation of Coronary Plaque Characteristics

      Atherosclerotic yellow plaques identified by coronary angioscopy are considered as vulnerable plaques. However, characteristics of yellow plaques are not well understood. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides accurate tissue characterization in vivo and has the capability to measure fibrous cap thickness covering a lipid plaque. Characteristics of yellow plaques identified by angioscopy were evaluated by OCT. We examined 205 plaques of 41 coronary arteries in 26 patients. In OCT analysis, plaques ...
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    13. 1-15 of 15
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  2. About Shigenobu Inami

    Shigenobu Inami, MD, is with the Department of Internal Medicine, Chiba-Hokusoh Hospital, Nippon Medical School, Chiba, Japan and also affiliated with the Skirball Center for Cardiovascular Research at the Cardiovascular Research Foundation in New York, NY.