1. Peter A. Calabresi

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    1. Mentioned In 67 Articles

    2. Optimal Inter‐Eye Difference Thresholds by OCT in MS: An International Study

      Optimal Inter‐Eye Difference Thresholds by OCT in MS: An International Study
      Objective To determine the optimal thresholds for inter‐eye differences in retinal nerve fiber and ganglion cell+inner plexiform layer thicknesses for identifying unilateral optic nerve lesions in multiple sclerosis. Background Current international diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis do not include the optic nerve as a lesion site despite frequent involvement. Optical coherence tomography detects retinal thinning associated with optic nerve lesions. Methods In this multi‐center international study at ...
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    3. Johns Hopkins Receives NIH Grant for Imaging Neurodegeneration in Multiple Sclerosis

      Johns Hopkins Receives NIH Grant for Imaging Neurodegeneration in Multiple Sclerosis
      Johns Hopkins University Receives a 2019 NIH Grant for $628,385 for Imaging Neurodegeneration in Multiple Sclerosis. The principal investigator is Peter Calabresi. The program began in 2013 and ends in 2023. Below is a summary of the proposed work. One of the significant challenges facing treatment of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) is determining their individual likelihood of progression, as this information would significantly influence the type of therapy ...
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    4. Image Artifacts In Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Among Patients With Multiple Sclerosis

      Image Artifacts In Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Among Patients With Multiple Sclerosis
      Purpose : To evaluate artifacts in OCT-A images of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and healthy controls. Materials and Methods : This was a prospective cross-sectional study conducted at the Department of Neurology and the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Subjects included patients with an established diagnosis of MS and healthy volunteers. OCT-A was performed using Spectralis OCT-A prototype, OCT2 (Heidelberg, Germany). The type and frequency of artifacts, the clinical factors ...
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    5. Retinal layer parcellation of optical coherence tomography images: Data resource for Multiple Sclerosis and Healthy Controls

      Retinal layer parcellation of optical coherence tomography images: Data resource for Multiple Sclerosis and Healthy Controls
      This paper presents optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the human retina and manual delineations of eight retinal layers. The data includes 35 human retina scans acquired on a Spectralis OCT system (Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany), 14 of which are healthy controls (HC) and 21 have a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). The provided data includes manually delineation of eight retina layers, which were independently reviewed and edited. The data ...
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    6. Spinal cord and infratentorial lesions in radiologically isolated syndrome are associated with decreased retinal ganglion cell/inner plexiform layer thickness

      Spinal cord and infratentorial lesions in radiologically isolated syndrome are associated with decreased retinal ganglion cell/inner plexiform layer thickness
      Background: The role of retinal imaging with optical coherence tomography (OCT) in assessing individuals with radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS) remains largely unexplored. Objective: To assess retinal layer thicknesses in RIS and examine their associations with clinical features suggestive of increased risk for conversion to multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: A total of 30 RIS subjects and 60 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC) underwent retinal imaging with spectral-domain OCT, followed by ...
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    7. The International Multiple Sclerosis Visual System Consortium: Advancing Visual System Research in Multiple Sclerosis

      The International Multiple Sclerosis Visual System Consortium: Advancing Visual System Research in Multiple Sclerosis
      ...from Novartis. The remaining authors report no conflicts of interest. L. J. Balcer, L. J. Balk, A. U. Brandt, P. A. Calabresi, E. H. Martinez-Lapiscina, R. Nolan, F. Paul, A. Petzold, and S. Saidha contributed equally an...
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    8. Emerging Applications of Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography (OCTA) in neurological research

      Emerging Applications of Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography (OCTA) in neurological research
      Purpose To review the clinical and research value of optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) in the field of neurology. Methods Current literature involving OCTA were reviewed through PubMed using the search terms optical coherence tomography angiography, with multiple sclerosis, Alzheimers disease, optic neuropathy, or other closely-related terms. Results OCTA has been applied in research to advance our understanding of the pathobiology of neurological disorders. OCTA-derived blood flow and vessel density ...
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    9. Retinal thickness measured with optical coherence tomography and risk of disability worsening in multiple sclerosis: a cohort study

      Retinal thickness measured with optical coherence tomography and risk of disability worsening in multiple sclerosis: a cohort study
      Background Most patients with multiple sclerosis without previous optic neuritis have thinner retinal layers than healthy controls. We assessed the role of peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (pRNFL) thickness and macular volume in eyes with no history of optic neuritis as a biomarker of disability worsening in a cohort of patients with multiple sclerosis who had at least one eye without optic neuritis available. Methods In this multicentre, cohort study ...
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    10. Optical coherence tomography: A quantitative tool to measure neurodegeneration and facilitate testing of novel treatments for tissue protection in multiple sclerosis

      Optical coherence tomography: A quantitative tool to measure neurodegeneration and facilitate testing of novel treatments for tissue protection in multiple sclerosis
      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a relatively new imaging technology that has been introduced as a powerful biomarker in neurological disease, including multiple sclerosis. In this review, OCT as an imaging technique, its reproducibility and validation in multiple sclerosis, application to other neurodegenerative diseases and future technological directions are discussed.
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    11. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Predicting Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Progression (Video)

      Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Predicting Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Progression (Video)
      Retinal thickness is a significant independent predictor of worsening disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) and should be incorporated into clinical trials and treatment decisions, according to a large longitudinal cohort study presented at the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Annual Meeting Optical coherence tomography (OCT), which is used to measure retinal thickness, can help clinicians predict multiple sclerosis (MS) progression two to five years later, according to an international longitudinal ...
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    12. The APOSTEL recommendations for reporting quantitative optical coherence tomography studies

      The APOSTEL recommendations for reporting quantitative optical coherence tomography studies
      Objective: To develop consensus recommendations for reporting of quantitative optical coherence tomography (OCT) study results. Methods: A panel of experienced OCT researchers (including 11 neurologists, 2 ophthalmologists, and 2 neuroscientists) discussed requirements for performing and reporting quantitative analyses of retinal morphology and developed a list of initial recommendations based on experience and previous studies. The list of recommendations was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group. Results: We ...
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    13. Voxel based morphometry in optical coherence tomography: validation and core findings

      Voxel based morphometry in optical coherence tomography: validation and core findings
      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the human retina is now becoming established as an important modality for the detection and tracking of various ocular diseases. Voxel based morphometry (VBM) is a long standing neuroimaging analysis technique that allows for the exploration of the regional differences in the brain. There has been limited work done in developing registration based methods for OCT, which has hampered the advancement of VBM analyses in ...
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    14. Simultaneous segmentation of retinal surfaces and microcystic macular edema in SDOCT volumes

      Simultaneous segmentation of retinal surfaces and microcystic macular edema in SDOCT volumes
      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging modality that has begun to find widespread use in retinal imaging for the detection of a variety of ocular diseases. In addition to structural changes in the form of altered retinal layer thicknesses, pathological conditions may also cause the formation of edema within the retina. In multiple sclerosis, for instance, the nerve fiber and ganglion cell layers are known to thin. Additionally ...
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    15. Combined registration and motion correction of longitudinal retinal OCT data

      Combined registration and motion correction of longitudinal retinal OCT data
      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become an important modality for examination of the eye. To measure layer thicknesses in the retina, automated segmentation algorithms are often used, producing accurate and reliable measurements. However, subtle changes over time are difficult to detect since the magnitude of the change can be very small. Thus, tracking disease progression over short periods of time is difficult. Additionally, unstable eye position and motion alter the ...
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    16. Optical Coherence Tomography in Neurologic Disease (Textbook)

      Optical Coherence Tomography in Neurologic Disease (Textbook)
      Shortly after the invention of the first two-dimensional optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans by James Fujimoto and colleagues at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1991, ophthalmologists recognized the extraordinary potential for OCT to facilitate quantitative assessment of the neuroretina. OCT rapidly became a commonplace tool in ophthalmologic practice to identify both inflammatory and degenerative conditions affecting the optic nerve and retina. The utility of OCT to detect and quantify ...
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  2. About Peter A. Calabresi

    Peter A. Calabresi

    Peter Calabresi is and Associate Professor of Neurology at John Hopkins and the Director of the Johns Hopkins Multiple Sclerosis Center.  Dr. Peter Calabresi received his undergraduate degree from Yale University and his medical degree from Brown University. He then completed an internship and residency training in internal medicine at Strong Memorial Hospital. He went on to complete a fellowship in neuroimmunology at the National Institutes of Health.

  3. Quotes

    1. The eye is the window into the brain and by measuring how healthy the eye is, we can determine how healthy the rest of the brain is...Eye scans are not that expensive, are really safe, and are widely used in ophthalmology, and now that we have evidence of their predictive value in MS, we think they are ready for prime time. We should be using this new quantitative tool to learn more about disease progression, including nerve damage and brain atrophy.
      In Using The Eye as a "Window To The Brain"