1. Pete H. Tomlins

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  2. About Pete H. Tomlins

    Pete H. Tomlins

    Pete Tomlins is at Queen Mary University of London.  Formerly, Dr. Tomlins was a Senior Scientist in the Optical Technologies Group at the UK’s National Physical Laboratory (NPL), where he leads a portfolio of projects in biomedical optics. His primary research interest is in quantitative OCT and understanding the physical origin of contrast in OCT images. A particular interest is cell and tissue optics where Pete is developing experimental methods to determine the spatially distributed optical properties of human tissue, correlating these with the presence and progress of disease. Optical properties of particular interest are refractive index, dispersion, absorption and scattering. A multiple-angle variant of OCT has been developed by Pete Tomlins group to perform these measurements, along with computational models and optical phantoms. Further interests include tissue engineering, where Pete has used Doppler OCT to determine the complex fluid flow within artificial tissue scaffolds, and dental composites research.

    Pete manages a number of collaborations with leading commercial and research organisation, and plans to increase the number and scope of such partnerships along with the activity at NPL.

  3. Quotes

    1. We anticipate that eventually such phantoms will be shipped with OCT systems when they are used clinically, together with a set of guidelines highlighting how they are to be used.
      In Spotting the signs: Improving resolution of systems used to image human tissue could help early identification of life-threatening diseases
    2. By removing the point-spread function from the data, we have actually seen an improvement of several microns in resolution of an OCT instrument, which is very exciting. We have demonstrated that you can now resolve two points that previously couldn't be resolved.
      In Spotting the signs: Improving resolution of systems used to image human tissue could help early identification of life-threatening diseases