1. Luigina Sorbara

    0 Comments Leave a Comment

    1-11 of 11
    1. Mentioned In 11 Articles

    2. 250 kHz, 1.5 µm resolution SD-OCT for in-vivo cellular imaging of the human cornea

      250 kHz, 1.5 µm resolution SD-OCT for in-vivo cellular imaging of the human cornea
      We present the first spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system that combines an isotropic imaging resolution of ~1.5 m in biological tissue with a 250 kHz image acquisition rate, for in vivo non-contact, volumetric imaging of the cellular structure of the human cornea. OCT images of the healthy human cornea acquired with this system reveal the cellular structure of the corneal epithelium, cellular debris and mucin clusters in ...
      Read Full Article
    3. Scleral Lens Clearance Assessment with Biomicroscopy and Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography

      Scleral Lens Clearance Assessment with Biomicroscopy and Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography
      SIGNIFICANCE It is important to be able to accurately estimate the central corneal clearance when fitting scleral contact lenses. Tools available have intrinsic biases due to the angle of viewing, and therefore an idea of the amount of error in estimation will benefit the fitter. PURPOSE To compare the accuracy of observers' ability to estimate scleral contact lens central corneal clearance (CCC) with biomicroscopy to measurements using slit-lamp imaging and ...
      Read Full Article
    4. In-vivo imaging of the palisades of Vogt and the limbal crypts with sub-micrometer axial resolution optical coherence tomography

      In-vivo imaging of the palisades of Vogt and the limbal crypts with sub-micrometer axial resolution optical coherence tomography
      A research-grade OCT system was used to image in-vivo and without contact with the tissue, the cellular structure and microvasculature of the healthy human corneo-scleral limbus. The OCT system provided 0.95 m axial and 4 m (2 m) lateral resolution in biological tissue depending on the magnification of the imaging objective. Cross-sectional OCT images acquired tangentially from the inferior limbus showed reflective, loop-like features that correspond to the fibrous ...
      Read Full Article
    5. Sub-micrometer axial resolution OCT for in-vivo imaging of the cellular structure of healthy and keratoconic human corneas

      Sub-micrometer axial resolution OCT for in-vivo imaging of the cellular structure of healthy and keratoconic human corneas
      Corneal degenerative conditions such as keratoconus (KC) cause progressive damage to the anterior corneal tissue and eventually severely compromise visual acuity. The ability to visualize corneal tissue damage in-vivo at cellular or sub-cellular level at different stages of development of KC and other corneal diseases, can aid the early diagnostics as well as the development of more effective treatment approaches for various corneal pathologies, including keratoconus. Here, we present the ...
      Read Full Article
    6. In Vivo Imaging and Morphometry of the Human Pre-Descemet's Layer and Endothelium With Ultrahigh-Resolution Optical Coherence Tomography

      In Vivo Imaging and Morphometry of the Human Pre-Descemet's Layer and Endothelium With Ultrahigh-Resolution Optical Coherence Tomography
      Purpose : To visualize in vivo and quantify the thickness of the posterior corneal layers: the acellular pre-Descemet's layer (PDL), Descemet's membrane (DM), and endothelium (END) in healthy subjects, using ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT). Methods : A research-grade, 800-nm UHR-OCT system with 0.95-m axial resolution in corneal tissue was used to image in vivo the posterior cornea in healthy subjects. The system offers approximately 98 dB sensitivity for ...
      Read Full Article
    7. Case report: Chalazion and its features visualized by ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography

      Case report: Chalazion and its features visualized by ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography
      Abstract Purpose The purpose of this case report is to highlight the clinical characteristics of a recurrent chalazion through the use of digital photography and ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHROCT). Case report A single case is presented, along with digital biomicroscopic photographs and UHROCT images. Discussion A review of the literature describing the histopathological and associations of chalazia and other disorders, suggest it may be possible to differentiate different ...
      Read Full Article
    8. Confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography imaging of hereditary granular dystrophy

      Objectives This case report examines the clinical characteristics of hereditary granular dystrophy through the use of slit lamp digital photography, confocal microscopy (CM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). A review of the literature describing the histopathological and genetic associations of stromal dystrophies, suggest it may be possible to differentiate dystrophies based on their clinical manifestations, and appearances of CM and OCT images, with or without the use of genetic testing ...
      Read Full Article
    9. 1-11 of 11
  1. Categories

    1. Applications:

      Art, Cardiology, Dentistry, Dermatology, Developmental Biology, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Microscopy, NDE/NDT, Neurology, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Other Non-Medical, Otolaryngology, Pulmonology, Urology
    2. Business News:

      Acquisition, Clinical Trials, Funding, Other Business News, Partnership, Patents
    3. Technology:

      Broadband Sources, Probes, Tunable Sources
    4. Miscellaneous:

      Jobs & Studentships, Student Theses, Textbooks
  2. About Luigina Sorbara

    Luigina Sorbara

    Luigina Sorbara is a clinical scientist at the school of optometry at the University of Waterloo.  Luigina Sorbara completed her M.Sc. degree in Physiological Optics in 1993 at the University of Waterloo. Since completing her OD degree, she has lectured and supervised clinical and laboratory sessions at the University of Waterloo, as well as working in private practice. Since 1984, Gina has been a Lecturer and Head of the Contact Lens Clinic at the University of Waterloo. Gina continues to lecture and is actively involved in research at the Centre for Contact Lens Research, of which she is an executive member. Her current research interests are in specialty (keratoconic) design contact lenses, corneal topography, fluorophotometry and clinical trials involving new lens materials, lens care and lens design systems.