1. Laura J. Balcer

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    1. Mentioned In 40 Articles

    2. Retinal thickness measured with optical coherence tomography and risk of disability worsening in multiple sclerosis: a cohort study

      Retinal thickness measured with optical coherence tomography and risk of disability worsening in multiple sclerosis: a cohort study
      Background Most patients with multiple sclerosis without previous optic neuritis have thinner retinal layers than healthy controls. We assessed the role of peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (pRNFL) thickness and macular volume in eyes with no history of optic neuritis as a biomarker of disability worsening in a cohort of patients with multiple sclerosis who had at least one eye without optic neuritis available. Methods In this multicentre, cohort study ...
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    3. Optical coherence tomography in an optic tract lesion, Retinal nerve fiber layer changes

      Optical coherence tomography in an optic tract lesion, Retinal nerve fiber layer changes
      A 49-year-old woman, status post temporal lobe resection, reported a hemianopia. Examination revealed a right afferent pupillary defect, horizontal bow-tie atrophy OD (temporal and nasal), and temporal atrophy OS. Optical coherence tomography showed a bow-tie pattern OD and predominant superior and inferior nerve fiber layer loss OS (figure 1; figure e-1 at Neurology.org ). The pattern OD is due to the combination of papillomacular bundle and nasal RNFL loss. The ...
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    4. Evaluation of the conjuntival blebs using spectral domain optical coherence tomography after glaucoma surgery

      Evaluation of the conjuntival blebs using spectral domain optical coherence tomography after glaucoma surgery
      Objective to investigate whether optical coherence tomography (OCT) could demonstrate axonal loss through thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Furthermore, the degree of RNFL loss was compared in the different MS subgroups (with or without optic neuritis, affected or fellow eye, single episode or recurrent optic neuritis, relapsing remitting or progressive MS). RNFL thinning was also determined in MS patients who had serial ...
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    5. The APOSTEL recommendations for reporting quantitative optical coherence tomography studies

      The APOSTEL recommendations for reporting quantitative optical coherence tomography studies
      Objective: To develop consensus recommendations for reporting of quantitative optical coherence tomography (OCT) study results. Methods: A panel of experienced OCT researchers (including 11 neurologists, 2 ophthalmologists, and 2 neuroscientists) discussed requirements for performing and reporting quantitative analyses of retinal morphology and developed a list of initial recommendations based on experience and previous studies. The list of recommendations was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group. Results: We ...
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    6. Optical Coherence Tomography in Neurologic Disease (Textbook)

      Optical Coherence Tomography in Neurologic Disease (Textbook)
      Shortly after the invention of the first two-dimensional optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans by James Fujimoto and colleagues at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1991, ophthalmologists recognized the extraordinary potential for OCT to facilitate quantitative assessment of the neuroretina. OCT rapidly became a commonplace tool in ophthalmologic practice to identify both inflammatory and degenerative conditions affecting the optic nerve and retina. The utility of OCT to detect and quantify ...
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    7. Retinal thickness measured with optical coherence tomography and risk of disability worsening in multiple sclerosis: a cohort study

      Retinal thickness measured with optical coherence tomography and risk of disability worsening in multiple sclerosis: a cohort study
      Background Most patients with multiple sclerosis without previous optic neuritis have thinner retinal layers than healthy controls. We assessed the role of peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (pRNFL) thickness and macular volume in eyes with no history of optic neuritis as a biomarker of disability worsening in a cohort of patients with multiple sclerosis who had at least one eye without optic neuritis available. Methods In this multicentre, cohort study ...
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    8. Utility of optical coherence tomography in the evaluation of monocular visual loss related to retinal ischemia

      Utility of optical coherence tomography in the evaluation of monocular visual loss related to retinal ischemia
      We report four patients with monocular visual loss for whom optical coherence tomography (OCT) was helpful in distinguishing the sequelae of retinal artery occlusion from those of primary optic neuropathy. Determinations of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness as well as macular retinal layer thicknesses and architecture were used. The major findings in our patients show that changes in the inner retinal layers (including ganglion cell and inner ...
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      Mentions: Laura J. Balcer
    9. Leading Edge Collaboration in Eye-Related Research Earns Investigators at NYU Langone Medical Center, Johns Hopkins, and the UT Southwestern Medical Center the 2015 Barancik Prize for Innovation in MS Research

      Leading Edge Collaboration in Eye-Related Research Earns Investigators at NYU Langone Medical Center, Johns Hopkins, and the UT Southwestern Medical Center the 2015 Barancik Prize for Innovation in MS Research
      The collaborative team of Drs. Laura Balcer , Peter Calabresi and Elliot Frohman have been selected as the winners of the 2015 Barancik Prize for Innovation in MS Research. This team of physician-scientists have worked together for almost 10 years to produce novel, ground-breaking and impactful research about the anatomy and biology of the retina and other structures of the eye in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). In their more than ...
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    10. Optical Coherence Tomography for the Neurologist

      Optical Coherence Tomography for the Neurologist
      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a relatively new technology that is now routinely and very widely used by ophthalmologists for structural documentation of the optic nerve and retina. In neuro-ophthalmology and neurology, the value of OCT is ever expanding; its role in an increasing number of conditions is being reported in parallel with the advances of the technology. Currently, as a clinical tool, OCT is particularly useful for the structural ...
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      Mentions: Laura J. Balcer
    11. Optical coherence tomography reflects brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis: A four-year study

      Optical coherence tomography reflects brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis: A four-year study
      Objective The aim of this work was to determine whether atrophy of specific retinal layers and brain substructures are associated over time, in order to further validate the utility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an indicator of neuronal tissue damage in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods Cirrus high-definition OCT (including automated macular segmentation) was performed in 107 MS patients biannually (median follow-up: 46 months). Three-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging ...
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    12. Optical coherence tomography reflects brain atrophy in MS: A four year study

      Optical coherence tomography reflects brain atrophy in MS: A four year study
      Objective : To determine whether atrophy of specific retinal layers and brain substructures are associated over time, in order to further validate the utility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an indicator of neuronal tissue damage in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods : Cirrus high definition OCT (including automated macular segmentation) was performed in 107 MS patients biannually (median follow-up: 46-months). Three-tesla magnetic resonance imaging brain scans (including brain-substructure volumetrics) were ...
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    13. The Latest on Optical Coherence Tomography

      The Latest on Optical Coherence Tomography
      Beginning almost 25 years ago, optical coherence tomography (OCT) began its journey into the mainstream of ophthalmology. Initially developed for retinal an vitro-retinal interface disease and glaucoma, this revolutionary technology has proven to ultimately have broader applications in neuro-ophthalmology and neurology, 2 specialties in which a better understating of OCT has led to more widespread investigation and clinical use.
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    14. Clinical trials to clinical use: using vision as a model for multiple sclerosis and beyond

      Clinical trials to clinical use: using vision as a model for multiple sclerosis and beyond
      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has made possible the structurefunction correlations that uniquely characterize the afferent visual pathway as a model for understanding multiple sclerosis (MS) and for developing new treatments. During the past decade, OCT measures of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and ganglion cell/inner plexiform layer (GCL + IPL) thickness have evolved from being a means to validate visual function tests, such as low-contrast letter acuity, to provide a ...
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    15. Quality control for retinal OCT in multiple sclerosis: validation of the OSCAR-IB criteria

      Quality control for retinal OCT in multiple sclerosis: validation of the OSCAR-IB criteria
      Background: Retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) permits quantification of retinal layer atrophy relevant to assessment of neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS). Measurement artefacts may limit the use of OCT to MS research. Objective: An expert task force convened with the aim to provide guidance on the use of validated quality control (QC) criteria for the use of OCT in MS research and clinical trials. Methods: A prospective multi-centre ( n = 13 ...
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  2. About Laura J. Balcer

    Laura J. Balcer

    Laura J. Balcer, MD, MSCE, is an Associate Professor of Neurology Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Neuro-ophthalmologist.

  3. Quotes

    1. Multiple Sclerosis researchers are very excited about OCT.
      In Eyes reveal health secrets of the brain