1. Christian R. Petersen

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    1. Mentioned In 10 Articles

    2. Feature Of The Week 04/28/2019: Real-Time High-Resolution Mid-Infrared OCT

      Feature Of The Week 04/28/2019: Real-Time High-ResolutionMid-Infrared OCT
      The potential for improving the penetration depth of optical coherence tomography systems by using light sources with longer wavelengths has been known since the inception of the technique in the early 1990s. Nevertheless, the development of mid-infrared optical coherence tomography has long been challenged by the maturity and fidelity of optical components in this spectral region, resulting in slow acquisition, low sensitivity, and poor axial resolution. In this work, a ...
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    3. Real-time high-resolution mid-infrared optical coherence tomography

      Real-time high-resolution mid-infrared optical coherence tomography
      The potential for improving the penetration depth of optical coherence tomography systems by using light sources with longer wavelengths has been known since the inception of the technique in the early 1990s. Nevertheless, the development of mid-infrared optical coherence tomography has long been challenged by the maturity and fidelity of optical components in this spectral region, resulting in slow acquisition, low sensitivity, and poor axial resolution. In this work, a ...
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    4. Real‐time High‐Resolution Mid‐infrared Optical Coherence Tomography

      Real‐time High‐Resolution Mid‐infrared Optical Coherence Tomography
      The potential for improving the penetration depth of optical coherence tomography systems by using increasingly longer wavelength light sources has been known since the inception of the technique in the early 1990s. Nevertheless, the development of mid‐infrared optical coherence tomography has long been challenged by the maturity and fidelity of optical components in this spectral region, resulting in slow acquisition, low sensitivity, and poor axial resolution. In this work ...
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    5. Feature Of The Week 1/13/13: Technical University of Denmark Publishes Detailed Quantitative Analysis of 1060nm Window for Optimal OCT Retinal Imaging

      Feature Of The Week 1/13/13: Technical University of Denmark Publishes Detailed Quantitative Analysis of 1060nm Window for Optimal OCT Retinal Imaging
      During the past decade, the wavelength range around the local water absorption minimum at 1060 nm has found increasing interest in the OCT community, as it allows imaging of the human posterior eye segment with improved penetration depth into the choroid and the sclera. However, the neighboring water absorption bands narrow the bandwidth of probing light, and reduce thus the achievable axial resolution. A detailed quantitative analysis of this effect ...
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    6. Investigation of the impact of water absorption on retinal OCT imaging in the 1060 nm range

      Investigation of the impact of water absorption on retinal OCT imaging in the 1060 nm range
      Recently, the wavelength range around 1060 nm has become attractive for retinal imaging with optical coherence tomography (OCT), promising deep penetration into the retina and the choroid. The adjacent water absorption bands limit the useful bandwidth of broadband light sources, but until now, the actual limitation has not been quantified in detail. We have numerically investigated the impact of water absorption on the axial resolution and signal amplitude for a ...
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    7. High-speed polarization-sensitive OCT at 1060 nm using a Fourier domain mode-locked swept source

      High-speed polarization-sensitive OCT at 1060 nm using a Fourier domain mode-locked swept source
      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) in the 1060nm range is interesting for in vivo imaging of the human posterior eye segment (retina, choroid, sclera), as it permits a long penetration depth. Complementary to structural images, polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) images visualize birefringent, polarization-maintaining or depolarizing areas within the sample. This information can be used to distinguish retinal layers and structures with different polarization properties. High imaging speed is crucial for imaging ocular ...
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    8. Broadband Fourier domain mode-locked laser for optical coherence tomography at 1060 nm

      Broadband Fourier domain mode-locked laser for optical coherence tomography at 1060 nm
      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) in the 1060nm range is interesting for in vivo imaging of the human posterior eye segment (retina, choroid, sclera) due to low absorption in water and deep penetration into the tissue. Rapidly tunable light sources, such as Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) lasers, enable acquisition of densely sampled three-dimensional datasets covering a wide field of view. However, semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs)-the typical laser gain media for ...
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    9. Fourier domain mode-locked swept source
 at 1050 nm based on a tapered amplifier

      Fourier domain mode-locked swept source
 at 1050 nm based on a tapered amplifier
      While swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) in the 1050 nm range is promising for retinal imaging, there are certain challenges. Conventional semiconductor gain media have limited output power, and the performance of high-speed Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) lasers suffers from chromatic dispersion in standard optical fiber. We developed a novel light source with a tapered amplifier as gain medium, and investigated the FDML performance comparing two fiber delay lines ...
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    10. FDML swept source at 1060 nm using a tapered amplifier

      FDML swept source at 1060 nm using a tapered amplifier
      We present a novel frequency-swept light source working at 1060nm that utilizes a tapered amplifier as gain medium. These devices feature significantly higher saturation power than conventional semiconductor optical amplifiers and can thus improve the limited output power of swept sources in this wavelength range. We demonstrate that a tapered amplifier can be integrated into a fiber-based swept source and allows for high-speed FDML operation. The developed light source operates ...
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    11. Frequency-swept laser light source at 1050 nm with higher bandwidth due to multiple semiconductor optical amplifiers in series

      We report on the development of an all-fiber frequency-swept laser light source in the 1050 nm range based on semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) with improved bandwidth due to multiple gain media. It is demonstrated that even two SOAs with nearly equal gain spectra can improve the performance of ... [Proc. SPIE 7168, 716824 (2009)] published Fri Feb 20, 2009.
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  2. About Christian R. Petersen

    Christian R. Petersen

    Christian Rosenberg Petersen (1987) is a postdoc researcher at the Department of Photonics Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, where he also received his B.Sc. (2011), M.Sc. (2013) and Ph.D. (2016). His main research area is mid-infrared supercontinuum generation and its applications within spectroscopy and imaging. He is perhaps best known for the first experimental demonstration of supercontinuum generation spanning the fingerprint region from 1.4-13.3 microns wavelength, which was published in Nature Photonics. He is also a co-founder and Head of Supercontinuum Development in the start-up company NORBLIS (est. 2018).