1. Bernd Hamann

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    1. Mentioned In 10 Articles

    2. An iterative closest point approach for the registration of volumetric human retina image data obtained by optical coherence tomography

      An iterative closest point approach for the registration of volumetric human retina image data obtained by optical coherence tomography
      This paper introduces an improved approach for the volume data registration of human retina. Volume data registration refers to calculating out a near-optimal transformation between two volumes with overlapping region and stitching them together. Iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm is a registration method that deals with registration between points. Classical ICP is time consuming and often traps in local minimum when the overlapping region is not big enough. Optical Coherence ...
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    3. Feature Of The Week 02/01/2015: Progress on Developing Adaptive Optics OCT for In Vivo Retinal Imaging: Monitoring and Correction of Eye Motion Artifacts (with Audio Narration)

      Feature Of The Week 02/01/2015: Progress on Developing Adaptive Optics OCT for In Vivo Retinal Imaging: Monitoring and Correction of Eye Motion Artifacts (with Audio Narration)
      Recent progress in retinal image acquisition techniques, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), combined with improved performance of adaptive optics (AO) instrumentation, has resulted in improvement in the quality of in vivo images of cellular structures in the human retina. Here, we present a short review of progress on developing AO-OCT instruments. Despite significant progress in imaging speed and resolution, eye movements present during acquisition of ...
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    4. Progress on Developing Adaptive Optics-Optical Coherence Tomography for In Vivo Retinal Imaging: Monitoring and Correction of Eye Motion Artifacts

      Progress on Developing Adaptive Optics-Optical Coherence Tomography for In Vivo Retinal Imaging: Monitoring and Correction of Eye Motion Artifacts
      Recent progress in retinal image acquisition techniques, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), combined with improved performance of adaptive optics (AO) instrumentation, has resulted in improvement in the quality of in vivo images of cellular structures in the human retina. Here, we present a short review of progress on developing AO-OCT instruments. Despite significant progress in imaging speed and resolution, eye movements present during acquisition of ...
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    5. Progress on Developing Adaptive Optics–Optical Coherence Tomography for In Vivo Retinal Imaging: Monitoring and Correction of Eye Motion Artifacts

      Progress on Developing Adaptive Optics–Optical Coherence Tomography for In Vivo Retinal Imaging: Monitoring and Correction of Eye Motion Artifacts
      Recent progress in retinal image acquisition techniques, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), combined with improved performance of adaptive optics (AO) instrumentation, has resulted in improvement in the quality of in vivo images of cellular structures in the human retina. Here, we present a short review of progress on developing AO-OCT instruments. Despite significant progress in imaging speed and resolution, eye movements present during acquisition of ...
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    6. In-vivo imaging of inner retinal cellular morphology with adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography: challenges and possible solutions

      In-vivo imaging of inner retinal cellular morphology with adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography: challenges and possible solutions
      Recent progress in retinal image acquisition techniques, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), combined with improved performance of adaptive optics (AO) instrumentation, has resulted in improvement in the quality of in vivo images of cellular structures in the outer layers of the human retina. Despite the significant progress in imaging cone and rod photoreceptor mosaics, visualization of cellular structures in the inner retina has been achieved ...
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    7. Feature Of The Week 6/27/10: Progress Report on Building an Anatomically Correct Solid Eye Model with Volumetric Representation of Retinal Morphology

      Feature Of The Week 6/27/10: Progress Report on Building an Anatomically Correct Solid Eye Model with Volumetric Representation of Retinal Morphology
      Feature Of The Week 6/27/10: The following summary is provided by T. Scott Rowe of Rowe Technical Design describing work on a reference eye model for OCT imaging. I have long had an interest in seeing how OCT technology could better integrate into retinal ophthalmic practices. The improvements in a
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    8. Improved representation of retinal data acquired with volumetric FD-OCT: co-registration, visualization and reconstruction of a large field of view

      Advances in Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (Fd-OCT) permit visualization of three-dimensional morphology of in-vivo retinal structures in a way that promises to revolutionize clinical and experimental imaging of the retina. The relevance of these advances will be further increased by th ...
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  2. About Bernd Hamann

    Bernd Hamann

    Bernd Hamann is a Professor and Associate Vice Chancellor for Research in the Computer Science Department at the University of California at Davis. Professor Hamann serves as Associate Vice Chancellor for Research. He was co-director of the Center for Image Processing and Integrated Computing (CIPIC), now called Institute for Data Analysis and Visualization (IDAV), from 1997 to 2004. His main research areas are visualization, geometric modeling and computer graphics. Professor Hamann received an NSF Research Initiation Award in 1992 and NSF CAREER Award in 1996. In 2006, he was awarded a University of California Presidential Chair in Undergraduate Education.