1. Articles from archivesofpathology.org

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    1. Imaging the Human Prostate Gland Using 1-μm-Resolution Optical Coherence Tomography

      Imaging the Human Prostate Gland Using 1-μm-Resolution Optical Coherence Tomography

      Context.— The accuracy of needle biopsy for the detection of prostate cancer is limited by well-known sampling errors. Thus, there is an unmet need for a microscopic screening tool that can screen large regions of the prostate comprehensively for cancer. Previous prostate imaging by optical coherence tomography (OCT) have had insufficient resolution for imaging cellular features related to prostate cancer. We have recently developed micro-optical coherence tomography (μOCT) that generates depth-resolved tissue images at a high frame rate with an isotropic resolution of 1 μm. Objective.— To demonstrate that optical images obtained with μOCT provide cellular-level contrast in prostate specimens ...

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    2. In Vivo and Ex Vivo Microscopy: Moving Toward the Integration of Optical Imaging Technologies Into Pathology Practice

      In Vivo and Ex Vivo Microscopy: Moving Toward the Integration of Optical Imaging Technologies Into Pathology Practice

      The traditional surgical pathology assessment requires tissue to be removed from the patient, then processed, sectioned, stained, and interpreted by a pathologist using a light microscope. Today, an array of alternate optical imaging technologies allow tissue to be viewed at high resolution, in real time, without the need for processing, fixation, freezing, or staining. Optical imaging can be done in living patients without tissue removal, termed in vivo microscopy, or also in freshly excised tissue, termed ex vivo microscopy. Both in vivo and ex vivo microscopy have tremendous potential for clinical impact in a wide variety of applications. However, in ...

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    3. In Vivo Optical Coherence Tomography: The Role of the Pathologist

      In Vivo Optical Coherence Tomography: The Role of the Pathologist

      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a nondestructive, high-resolution imaging modality, providing cross-sectional, architectural images at near histologic resolutions, with penetration depths up to a few millimeters. Optical frequency domain imaging is a second-generation OCT technology that has equally high resolution with significantly increased image acquisition speeds and allows for large area, high-resolution tissue assessments. These features make OCT and optical frequency domain imaging ideal imaging techniques for surface and endoscopic imaging, specifically when tissue is unsafe to obtain and/or suffers from biopsy sampling error. This review focuses on the clinical impact of OCT in coronary, esophageal, and pulmonary imaging ...

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    1-3 of 3
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