1. 1-5 of 5
    1. Choroid and choriocapillaris changes in early-stage Parkinson’s disease: a swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography-based cross-sectional study

      Choroid and choriocapillaris changes in early-stage Parkinson’s disease: a swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography-based cross-sectional study

      Background: Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases in the aging population. Previous literature has reported thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer, and photoreceptor layer in PD patients. However, very few studies have used swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) to study the choroid and choriocapillaris vascular changes in PD and their correlations with altered contrast sensitivity. Methods: PD patients and controls were enrolled in the current study. We used a CSV-1000E instrument to assess contrast sensitivity and performed SS-OCT and SS-OCTA to measure outer retinal thickness, choroidal thickness ...

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    2. A multi-regression framework to improve diagnostic ability of optical coherence tomography retinal biomarkers to discriminate mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease

      A multi-regression framework to improve diagnostic ability of optical coherence tomography retinal biomarkers to discriminate mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease

      Background Diagnostic performance of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) remains limited. We assessed whether compensating the circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (cpRNFL) thickness for multiple demographic and anatomical factors as well as the combination of macular layers improves the detection of MCI and AD. Methods This cross-sectional study of 62 AD ( n  = 92 eyes), 108 MCI ( n  = 158 eyes), and 55 cognitively normal control ( n  = 86 eyes) participants. Macular ganglion cell complex (mGCC) thickness was extracted. Circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (cpRNFL) measurement was compensated for several ocular factors. Thickness ...

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    3. A multi-regression framework to improve diagnostic ability of optical coherence tomography retinal biomarkers to discriminate mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease

      A multi-regression framework to improve diagnostic ability of optical coherence tomography retinal biomarkers to discriminate mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease

      Background: Diagnostic performance of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) remains limited. We assessed whether compensating the circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (cpRNFL) thickness for multiple demographic and anatomical factors as well as the combination of macular layers improves the detection of MCI and AD. Methods: This cross-sectional study of 62 AD (n = 92 eyes), 108 MCI (n = 158 eyes), and 55 cognitively normal control (n = 86 eyes) participants. Macular ganglion cell complex (mGCC) thickness was extracted. Circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (cpRNFL) measurement was compensated for several ocular factors. Thickness ...

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    4. Combination of snapshot hyperspectral retinal imaging and optical coherence tomography to identify Alzheimer’s disease patients

      Combination of snapshot hyperspectral retinal imaging and optical coherence tomography to identify Alzheimer’s disease patients

      The eye offers potential for the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with retinal imaging techniques being explored to quantify amyloid accumulation and aspects of neurodegeneration. To assess these changes, this proof-of-concept study combined hyperspectral imaging and optical coherence tomography to build a classification model to differentiate between AD patients and controls.

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      Mentions: K. U. Leuven
    5. Optical coherence tomography angiography as a potential screening tool for cerebral small vessel diseases

      Optical coherence tomography angiography as a potential screening tool for cerebral small vessel diseases

      Background The retina and the brain share anatomic, embryologic, and physiologic characteristics. Therefore, retinal imaging in patients with brain disorders has been of significant interest. Using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA), a novel quantitative method of measuring retinal vasculature, we aimed to evaluate radial peripapillary capillary (RPC) network density and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in cognitively impaired patients and determine their association with brain imaging markers. Methods In this prospective cross-sectional study, a total of 69 patients (138 eyes) including 29 patients with amyloid-positive Alzheimer’s disease-related cognitive impairment (ADCI), 25 patients with subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (SVCI ...

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    1-5 of 5
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