1. Articles from PhysOrg.com

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    1. Study shines light on alternative medical imaging techniques

      Study shines light on alternative medical imaging techniques

      ith a thin probe and a burst of microwaves, doctors can eradicate cancer cells without opening up a patient for surgery. But when you're trying to cook a tiny amount of precancerous tissue to death in an area as delicate as, say, the esophagus—where muscles control the flow of food into the stomach—precision is paramount. A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison biomedical engineers is working to hone new imaging techniques that could allow for finer monitoring of this kind of minimally invasive ablation treatment. In an exploratory study recently published in the journal Biomedical Optics Express , College ...

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    2. Award winning algorithm could improve accuracy and speed of diagnosis of retinal disease

      Award winning algorithm could improve accuracy and speed of diagnosis of retinal disease

      A new technique for identifying and diagnosing damage to the human retina has been awarded 'Best Student Paper' at the industry-leading BIOIMAGING 2018 conference in Portugal. Doctoral candidate Bashir Dodo, from Brunel University London's Department of Computer Science, demonstrated a new algorithm for OCT (Optical Coherence Tomography) equipment which can automatically segment images of the retina into distinct layers. It's hoped the new technique, which can separate the retina into seven distinct layers, could improve the accuracy and speed of diagnosis , and help save the sight of patients by identifying damage earlier. Having taken inspiration from the psychological ...

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    3. Researchers seek to catch Alzheimer's early by peeking into the eyes

      Researchers seek to catch Alzheimer's early by peeking into the eyes

      Mark Wolff wanted to know. To him, the thought of suffering through Alzheimer's disease the way his father did—without knowing, and without his family knowing, what he was up against until late in its progression— is worse than learning, even while he's still perfectly healthy, that a possible precursor of the disease has gained a toehold Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-08-alzheimer-early-peeking-eyes.html#jCp

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    4. Scientists turbocharge high-resolution, 3-D imaging

      Scientists turbocharge high-resolution, 3-D imaging

      You may not have heard of optical coherence tomography, or OCT. But if you've visited an ophthalmologist recently, chances are your eye came within an inch or two of a scanning device employing the technology. Tens of thousands of these devices are in place in doctors' offices, where they're widely used to check for eye diseases. Now, Stanford University scientists have figured out how to retrofit these high-performance machines with off-the-shelf components, increasing OCT's resolution by several-fold and promising earlier detection of retinal and corneal damage, incipient tumors and more. The relatively simple, low-cost fix—entailing a ...

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    5. Breakthrough in live coral imaging

      Breakthrough in live coral imaging

      Corals are calcifying animals and are the prime architects of the most diverse marine ecosystem, the coral reefs. The coral animal harbors tiny microalgae as symbionts in its tissue, where they fix CO2 via photosynthesis and provide the animal host with organic carbon for its respiration. In turn, the microalgae obtain shelter and nutrients in the coral tissue, which extends over a complex calcium carbonate skeleton deposited by the animal host. The coral host takes several measures to optimize light harvesting of its symbionts, while avoiding excess light exposure. This includes tissue contraction and relaxation as well as synthesis of ...

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    6. Internal fingerprint sensor peers inside fingertips for more surefire ID

      Internal fingerprint sensor peers inside fingertips for more surefire ID

      In the 1971 film Diamonds are Forever, British secret agent James Bond uses fake fingerprints as part of a ploy to assume the identity of a diamond smuggler. At the time, sham prints were purely a futuristic bit of Bond gadgetry, but technology has since caught up. In 2002, the Japanese cryptographer Tsutomu Matsumoto showed that imitation fingerprints made cheaply from gelatin, a main component of gummy sweets, could trick up to 80 percent of standard fingerprint sensors. The sensors also sometimes fail to recognize legitimate prints when the finger being scanned is dirty, worn, scarred, or too wet or ...

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    7. Noninvasive imaging method looks deeper inside the body to study living brain

      Noninvasive imaging method looks deeper inside the body to study living brain

      Researchers at the University of Washington (UW) have used a noninvasive light-based imaging technology to literally see inside the living brain, providing a new tool to study how diseases like dementia, Alzheimer's, and brain tumors change brain tissue over time. The work is reported by Woo June Choi and Ruikang Wang of the UW Department of Bioengineering, today in the Journal of Biomedical Optics . "The paper shows significantly enhanced imaging depth using a noninvasive laser-enabled technique for deep tissue imaging. In the brain, the imaging depth is almost doubled," said journal editorial board member Martin Leahy of the National ...

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    8. New lasers offer low cost industrial processing and novel surgical possibilities

      New lasers offer low cost industrial processing and novel surgical possibilities

      EU scientists have developed efficient new fibre optic lasers that deliver short wavelengths for accurate polymer material processing, at incredible strength and low cost. The consortium behind the new innovations, developed through the ISLA project, is now in the process of marketing some of these cutting edge devices.

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    9. Self-sweeping laser could dramatically shrink 3-D mapping systems

      Self-sweeping laser could dramatically shrink 3-D mapping systems

      A new approach that uses light to move mirrors could usher in a new generation of laser technology for a wide range of applications, including remote sensing, self-driving car navigation and 3D biomedical imaging. A team of University of California, Berkeley, engineers led by Connie Chang-Hasnain, a professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences, used a novel concept to automate the way a light source changes its wavelength as it sweeps the surrounding landscape. They report their findings in the journal Scientific Reports , to be published Thursday, Sept. 3. The advance could have implications for imaging technology using LIDAR, or ...

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    10. Small, inexpensive, and incredibly resilient: A new femtosecond laser for industry

      Small, inexpensive, and incredibly resilient: A new femtosecond laser for industry

      A team at the University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics has created a laser capable of generating ultrashort pulses of light even under extremely difficult external conditions. This unique combination of precision and resilience is due to the fact that the whole process of generating femtosecond laser pulses takes place within a specially-selected optical fiber. Its appearance seems quite inconspicuous: just a flat, rectangular box, tens of centimeters across and about the same height, with a thin, shiny-tipped "thread" leading out of it, so long that it is rolled up into a coil. This small instrument, built by physicists from ...

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    11. Technique to measure volumes of key 'Lab on a Chip' components

      Technique to measure volumes of key 'Lab on a Chip' components

      Imagine shrinking tubes and beakers—in fact, most of a clinical chemistry lab—down to the size of a credit card. When engineers figured out how to do that two decades ago, they enabled complex tests to be performed with tiny "lab on a chip" technology. But until now, there has been no way to accurately measure the size of the tiny vessels they created. Now,scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have found a potential solution to this longstanding manufacturing issue. The NIST approach could meet an important need in the microfluidics industry, which creates devices ...

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    12. Laser comb system maps 3-D surfaces remotely for manufacturing, forensics

      Laser comb system maps 3-D surfaces remotely for manufacturing, forensics

      Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have demonstrated a laser-based imaging system that creates high-definition 3D maps of surfaces from as far away as 10.5 meters. The method may be useful in diverse fields, including precision machining and assembly, as well as in forensics.

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    1-12 of 12
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