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    1. OCT Promising as Clear Point-of-Care Solution

      OCT Promising as Clear Point-of-Care Solution

      Medical devices at the point of care allow clinicians to do what they do best: determine a patient’s exact condition and a course of treatment. These technologies work best when they fit seamlessly into the provider-patient workflow without a steep learning curve or worry about the underlying scientific principles, and without the high cost seen for so many medical technologies. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging technology that has become well-known in recent years for its proven diagnostic ability, particularly in the eye care realm. This technology is now the gold standard for diagnosing eye diseases such as ...

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    2. Vying for Dominance: Swept-Source vs. Spectral-Domain OCT

      Vying for Dominance: Swept-Source vs. Spectral-Domain OCT

      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is among the most widely used in vivo optical diagnostic techniques. This high-resolution 3D imaging modality, with market size approaching $1 billion, has established itself as an indispensable tool for ophthalmology and is seeing growing acceptance in interventional cardiology, dermatology and nondestructive testing. OCT combines micron-level resolution with high speed and penetration up to 2 to 3 mm in the scattering tissue. In addition, instrumentation is relatively inexpensive and portable when compared to other 3D medical imaging modalities, such as MRI and CT. Figure 1. An example of using SS-OCT for studying therapeutic potential of allogeneic ...

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    3. Evolution of the Supercontinuum Light Source

      Evolution of the Supercontinuum Light Source

      For many applications, coherent light at a single frequency is more than adequate. But having a light source that combines the properties of a laser with the broad bandwidth of an incandescent bulb and a short pulse duration opens up a new realm of possibilities in medical imaging, communications, displays and materials studies. One of most extraordinary discoveries of optical effects came in 1970 from Robert Alfano and Stanley Shapiro 1 . The duo demonstrated the conversion of a narrow band color — for example, green light of short duration — to white color and beyond. This was accomplished by nonlinear effect, and ...

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    4. Blackbird, TU Munich, Collaborate for OCT in Auto Manufacturing

      Blackbird, TU Munich, Collaborate for OCT in Auto Manufacturing

      Remote laser welding system manufacturer Blackbird Robotersysteme GmbH is participating in a research project with the Technical University of Munich’s Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management and multiple industrial partners to explore optical coherence tomography's potential for remote laser welding in auto manufacturing. The project will investigate innovative technology for more flexibility in body construction, particularly electro mobility. Germany's Federal Ministry of Education and Research is sponsoring the project under the Photonics Research Germany research incentive program. The German government's goal is to advance electromobility. Disappointed electric vehicle sales point to inflexible production structures which ...

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    5. Adoption Depends on Meeting Clinical Needs

      Adoption Depends on Meeting Clinical Needs

      Every year, I am amazed and impressed by the number and variety of presentations at conferences in the field of biophotonics . We are blessed by the seemingly endless ways to manipulate and measure light, relatively inexpensively, in our pursuit of powerful new ways to understand, diagnose and treat disease. Much human ingenuity has been applied to overcoming difficult technical problems and pushing back the bounds of our knowledge. But then I usually pause for reflection: How much of this advanced technology and research ends up in practical, routine use by clinicians caring for their patients? Of course, there are some ...

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    6. Superluminescent LEDs Bridge the Gap

      Superluminescent LEDs Bridge the Gap

      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is perhaps the most widely known application for SLED sources. This noninvasive imaging technique produces real-time, cross-sectional images with a resolution of a few microns. In just 20 years, it has become a well-established medical procedure in the fields of ophthalmology, cardiology, gastroenterology and dermatology, with a market size approaching $1 billion for system sales. While swept source lasers have received much attention with the switch to higher resolution spectral domain (SD)-OCT about a decade ago, SLEDs still remain the preferred light source for most OEM applications because of their simplicity, compactness and cost. OCT ...

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    7. Added Intelligence Transforms Medical Sensors Into Diagnostic Devices

      Added Intelligence Transforms Medical Sensors Into Diagnostic Devices

      According to a 2017 market report 1 by market research and strategic consulting company Yole Développement of Lyon, France, the medical industry has a growing interest in solid-state technologies in order to answer the challenges of miniaturization, patient safety, early diagnostics, low power consumption and cost-savings. “Three hundred fifty million dollars of solid-state optical sensor devices for medical imaging applications has been sold in 2016,” said Benjamin Roussel, business unit manager of Yole’s MedTech activity. Yole expects a growth of 8.3 percent in the next five years, he said. Today’s optical sensors measure a variety of ...

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    8. Advances in Surgical Microscopes Pave the Way to Improved Outcomes

      Advances in Surgical Microscopes Pave the Way to Improved Outcomes

      The new generation of devices can heighten resolution, integrate patient data with intraoperative images and allow for more exact localization of surgical targets. By integrating intelligence, video, intraoperative-imaging and navigation technologies, today’s surgical microscopes provide surgeons with insights to improve their decision-making at the point of care and provide patients with the best possible outcomes. Surgical microscopes enable physicians to perform delicate surgery through tiny incisions. With a microscope, a surgeon can visualize anatomy within small cavities not perceptible by the human eye alone. They have long been used for ophthalmology.

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    9. OCT Angiography Opens Eyes

      OCT Angiography Opens Eyes

      Dr. Daniela Ferrara, an assistant professor of ophthalmology at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, began researching retinal diseases in 1998. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in elderly individuals of European descent, has been a recurring topic in her research. However, it was not until about two years ago — when Ferrara started testing prototype optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) devices — that she saw just how much at the back of her patients’ eyes had been escaping her own eyes. For example, Ferrara identified choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in the OCT-A scan of an elderly patient long ...

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    10. Where Does OCT Go From Here?

      Where Does OCT Go From Here?

      OCT-A — optical coherence tomography angioplasty — which allows imaging without dye, is a promising breakthrough in the detection of early-stage glaucoma. And swept-source OCT has opened new possibilities for diagnosing diabetic retinopathy and early macular degeneration. Although ophthalmology continues to dominate the OCT landscape, this imaging technology also has seen new adaptations outside that field. In dermatology, it is used for the diagnosis and treatment of

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    11. St. Jude Medical Reaches Primary Endpoint for OCT Trial

      St. Jude Medical Reaches Primary Endpoint for OCT Trial

      A trial undertaken by medical device company St. Jude Medical Inc. has met its primary endpoint as the first multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled study comparing optical coherence tomography- (OCT), intravascular ultrasound- (IVUS) and angiography-guided outcomes for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The ILUMIEN III study demonstrated PCI guided by OCT to be superior to angiography in stent expansion and procedural success and non-inferior to IVUS-guided PCI in post-procedure minimal stent area (MSA). Physicians employed the St. Jude Medical OPTIS Integrated and ILUMIEN OPTIS PCI optimization systems, along with the Dragonfly imaging catheters designed for high-resolution imaging, to assess vessel and lesion ...

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      Mentions: St. Jude Medical
    12. OCT-A Detects Early Stage Glaucoma

      OCT-A Detects Early Stage Glaucoma

      Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) was used at the earliest stages of glaucoma to identify the characteristic patterns of different forms of the disease. OCT-A, a noninvasive technique that employs en face reconstruction of OCT combined with motion contrast processing to reveal perfused retinal vasculature, could enable doctors to diagnose glaucoma cases earlier than ever before and potentially slow down the progression of the disease.

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      Mentions: Richard B. Rosen
    13. OCT Angiography Opens Eyes

      OCT Angiography Opens Eyes

      Dr. Daniela Ferrara, an assistant professor of ophthalmology at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, began researching retinal diseases in 1998. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in elderly individuals of European descent, has been a recurring topic in her research. However, it was not until about two years ago — when Ferrara started testing prototype optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) devices — that she saw just how much at the back of her patients’ eyes had been escaping her own eyes. For example, Ferrara identified choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in the OCT-A scan of an elderly patient long ...

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    14. SS-OCT PCIe Card from Keysight Technologies

      SS-OCT PCIe Card from Keysight Technologies

      Keysight Technologies Inc. offers swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) application options for the U5303A compact, dual-channel ADC card, delivering high dynamic range and a high effective number of bits for enhanced image quality. The new options support up to 1 GS/s on the 12-bit, high-speed data acquisition peripheral component interconnect express (PCIe) card. Image acquisition is featured at a rate of 200 kHz, continuously. The real-time processing solution allows OEMs to develop SS-OCT engines using the development environment provided, which includes a graphical user interface and C++ programming language. The new options also ensure improved spurious-free dynamic range ...

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    15. Clinicians Demand More From Optical Devices

      Clinicians Demand More From Optical Devices

      From the ubiquity of smartphones to an aging population, the modern world offers the optical sector a wealth of opportunities to innovate for the health care sector. Optical technologies have a long history of providing a rapid and noninvasive way of diagnosing, imaging and operating that other methods simply cannot match. It’s little wonder then that the health care sector continues to call for fresh ideas from the optics industry. From novel therapies to adding new functionality to existing devices, in addition to exploiting the huge growth of products in the consumer market, the opportunities for innovation are extensive ...

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    16. Photonics Media Seeks Presenters for Biophotonic Imaging Digital Conference

      Photonics Media Seeks Presenters for Biophotonic Imaging Digital Conference

      Researchers in the field of bioimaging around the world are invited to give presentations at a digital conference to be hosted by Photonics Media this summer. “Biophotonic Imaging for Medicine” will focus on a range of light-based imaging and microscopy techniques for diagnosing and assessing illness, or studying other attributes and functions of biological tissue in a biomedical context. It will take place from 1 to 5 p.m. EST on Thursday, June 11. Click here to submit an abstract. Like Photonics Media’s popular series of webinars, the conference will be presented free via the Web to a knowledgeable ...

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    17. UV-VIS Spectroscopy in the Clinic – What’s Stopping It?

      UV-VIS Spectroscopy in the Clinic – What’s Stopping It?

      Bigio’s team isn’t the only one to encounter this difficulty in attracting funding. Dr. Adam Wax’s group at Duke University has been developing a technique – angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry, or a/LCI – enabling early detection of cancer and other biomedical applications by measuring the average size of cell nuclei using scattered light. The focus of the a/LCI instrument has been Barrett’s esophagus, a precursor to esophageal cancer. But Wax is also looking beyond the upper GI tract. In his research lab at Duke, he and colleagues have been working to develop the technology further, to bring ...

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    18. Seeing the Light: How Photonics Continues to Improve Eyesight

      Seeing the Light: How Photonics Continues to Improve Eyesight

      In 1981, Rangaswamy “Sri” Srinivasan, a researcher at IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center, experimented with a pulsed argon fluoride (ArF) excimer laser on turkey leftovers, and lasers have had an ever-growing role in ophthalmology ever since. That landmark resulted in the first laser-based vision-correction techniques, including laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (lasik) and photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) techniques. Ophthalmology uses numerous photonic technologies – Nd:YAG and femtosecond excimer lasers, 3-D imaging techniques and OCT (optical coherence tomography) – to diagnose and treat eye diseases and vision problems. Today, these techniques are being combined into systems that are revolutionizing the eye surgeon ...

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    19. Ultrafast Laser Systems Are Stepping Up to Meet Industry Needs

      Ultrafast Laser Systems Are Stepping Up to Meet Industry Needs

      The wide spectral bandwidth of ultrafast lasers also is useful in optical coherence tomography, widely used to provide 3-D images of tissue. Here, the very broad spectral output of supercontinuum lasers allows for very high axial resolution imaging in multiple user-defined wavelength bands optimized for the tissue being imaged. “The high power and spectral brightness of supercontinuum lasers also allows for deep-tissue imaging, such as in highly scattering media, or in vivo imaging, where signal levels can be very low,” Seaton said.

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      Mentions: Fianium
    20. OCT Technologies, Applications Showing Great Promise

      OCT Technologies, Applications Showing Great Promise

      OCT is growing. As we reported in the July issue, the optical imaging market is set to reach $1.9 billion by the end of 2018 – a compound annual growth rate of 11.37 percent – and OCT makes up 70 percent or more of that market, according to a study by Research and Markets. But if you only go by the numbers, you don’t get the whole story. Sure, 70 percent is great for OCT, but where is it really going? To get a more in-depth perspective, BioPhotonics interviewed representatives from companies that are big players in the OCT ...

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    21. Imaging Tech Could Lower Heart Disease Deaths

      Imaging Tech Could Lower Heart Disease Deaths

       Under a two-year, $498,325 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II National Science Foundation grant, Wasatch Photonics Inc. will continue the development of its intravascular optical coherence tomography technique, which shows where lesions and plaques have formed. Physicians can use these images to determine the best course of action, and to resolve issues such as stent placement. The technology will provide a new tool to identify and treat coronary artery disease, which “affects an estimated 16 million Americans and is a primary cause of heart attacks and strokes,” said William J. Brown, vice president of business development. “Identifying and ...

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    22. FAMOS Aims to Make OCT Light Sources More Compact

      FAMOS Aims to Make OCT Light Sources More Compact

      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) light sources will shrink to one-fifth the size of conventional devices with the help of a tapered laser being developed by the European Union project FAMOS (Functional Anatomical Molecular Optical Screening). Seventeen partners have joined forces under the FAMOS project to bring OCT — a key technology displaying structures located a few millimeters inside the tissue — to the forefront. The approach pursued for OCT requires white laser light that emerges when a special glass fiber is irradiated with a femtosecond laser. As these lasers generate heat, they must be cooled with water, making the equipment needed for ...

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    23. Ultra-Wideband Fused Couplers for OCT

      Ultra-Wideband Fused Couplers for OCT

      Gooch & Housego has introduced ultra-wideband fused couplers for the optical coherence tomography (OCT) market. The fused fiber couplers, featuring low loss and wide bandwidth, are suitable for designing compact interferometer modules for OCT applications including long haul-telecommunications. The ultra-wideband family of fused fiber couplers has been developed in response to recent advances in OCT technology, where certain applications are demanding wider optical source bandwidths to improve image resolution. The company says that it has recently shipped components operating over 260-nm bandwidth centered at 1050 nm. To contact the manufacturer of this product, click here .

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      Mentions: Gooch & Housego
    24. OCT Images Blood Vessels that Feed Cancer

      OCT Images Blood Vessels that Feed Cancer

      An optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique that noninvasively maps the network of tiny blood vessels in the epidermis could soon help doctors better diagnose, monitor and treat skin cancer. Scientists at Medical University Vienna (MUW) are the first to use the high-resolution three-dimensional imaging method to visualize the network of blood vessels beneath the outer layer of the skin — the epidermis — that feed cancerous lesions. A laser light source developed at Ludwig Maximilian University was used to maximize image quality. It also enabled unprecedented high-speed imaging and operated at a near-infrared wavelength for better skin penetration. “The condition of the ...

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    1-24 of 57 1 2 3 »
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