1. 1-17 of 17
    1. Study shows loud noises cause fluid buildup in the ear and suggests simple cure for noise-induced hearing loss

      Study shows loud noises cause fluid buildup in the ear and suggests simple cure for noise-induced hearing loss

      Exposure to loud noise, such as a firecracker or an ear-splitting concert, is the most common preventable cause of hearing loss. Research suggests that 12% or more of the world population is at risk for noise-induced loss of hearing. Loud sounds can cause a loss of auditory nerve cells in the inner ear, which are responsible for sending acoustic information to the brain, resulting in hearing difficulty. However, the mechanism behind this hearing loss is not fully understood.

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    2. Spotting colon cancer early with the 'Google Earth of colonoscopies'

      Spotting colon cancer early with the 'Google Earth of colonoscopies'

      A new optical imaging system in the works could revolutionize the diagnosis of colon cancer. Currently, colonoscopies only manage to detect 39 % of bowel cancer cases in the early stages. Now, the EU-funded PROSCOPE project's novel screening platform has the potential to save up to half of the 160 000 lives lost in Europe every year because of this disease. Today's colonoscopy procedures are based on white light video or optical narrow-band imaging.

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    3. The unexpected journey of the egg and the embryo through the fallopian tube

      The unexpected journey of the egg and the embryo through the fallopian tube

      The journey of the egg and the embryo through the fallopian tube or oviduct toward the uterus is not well understood, mainly because it is inaccessible for direct imaging. Looking to shed new light on the dynamics of the eggs prior to fertilization and embryo transport preceding implantation, researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Stevens Institute of Technology developed a novel imaging approach that has allowed them to see eggs and embryos as they move along the fallopian tube in a live animal.

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    4. Scientists develop AI platform to assess blood vessel anomalies and eye disease

      Scientists develop AI platform to assess blood vessel anomalies and eye disease

      An international team of scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), Brown University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has developed an artificial intelligence (AI) platform that could one day be used in a system to assess vascular diseases, which are characterized by the abnormal condition of blood vessels.

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    5. Novel deep learning method enables clinic-ready automated screening for diabetes-related eye disease

      Novel deep learning method enables clinic-ready automated screening for diabetes-related eye disease

      Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München together with LMU University Eye Hospital Munich and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) created a novel deep learning method that makes automated screenings for eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy more efficient. Reducing the amount of expensive annotated image data that is required for the training of the algorithm, the method is attractive for clinics. In the use case of diabetic retinopathy, the researchers developed a screening algorithm that needs 75 percent less annotated data and achieves the same diagnostic performance of human experts

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    6. Parkinson's disease can affect the eyes, and here's what we know so far

      Parkinson's disease can affect the eyes, and here's what we know so far

      Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, affecting over 10 million people worldwide . It's characterized by changes in movement, including tremors, and slower and more rigid movements. But researchers are also beginning to investigate other symptoms of Parkinson's disease—including those involving the eye .

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    7. Artificial intelligence recognizes deteriorating photoreceptors

      Artificial intelligence recognizes deteriorating photoreceptors

      Software based on artificial intelligence (AI), which was developed by researchers at the Eye Clinic of the University Hospital Bonn, Stanford University and University of Utah, enables the precise assessment of the progression of geographic atrophy (GA), a disease of the light sensitive retina caused by age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This innovative approach permits the fully automated measurement of the main atrophic lesions using data from optical coherence tomography, which provides three-dimensional visualization of the structure of the retina. In addition, the research team can precisely determine the integrity of light sensitive cells of the entire central retina and also ...

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    8. Outer hair cells regulate ear's sensitivity to sound

      Outer hair cells regulate ear's sensitivity to sound

      The ear's tiny outer hair cells adjust the sensitivity of neighbouring inner hair cells to sound levels rather than acting emke an ampemfier, suggests a new study pubemshed today in eLife . The discovery in gerbils contributes to our understanding of the role that outer hair cells play in hearing. The findings could also be useful for developing better ways to protect these deemcate cells from harm to prevent hearing loss . Tiny cells with hair-emke protrusions in the inner ear act emke microphones by converting vibrations caused by sound into electrical signals that the brain interprets. These inner hair cells ...

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    9. Researchers have identified areas of the retina that change in mild Alzheimer's disease

      Researchers have identified areas of the retina that change in mild Alzheimer's disease

      Researchers at the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) have identified changes in retinal layer thickness, inflammation or thinning in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease, confirming that the retina is one of the most important biomarkers for early diagnosis of the disease. For the first time, researchers have determined the shape and size of the areas that present significant thinning in each retinal layer, which tend to occur in the same locations.

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    10. Abird's eye view for improved diagnosis

      Abird's eye view for improved diagnosis

      An effective method of screening patients for closed-angle glaucoma has been developed by A*STAR researchers. In closed-angle glaucoma , the optic nerve is damaged because the aqueous fluid in the eye does not drain properly. This is because the gap between the cornea and the iris, known as the anterior chamber angle, where fluid normally flows through the eye, has narrowed significantly or become blocked. The resulting build-up of pressure within the eye, which can happen rapidly, can cause irreversible blindness. Current diagnosis of closed-angle glaucoma involves analyzing 'anterior segment optical coherence tomography' (AS-OCT) images, which are cross-sectional pictures of ...

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    11. Eyes of Ebola survivors show localized pathological changes

      Eyes of Ebola survivors show localized pathological changes

      Paul J. Steptoe, M.B.Ch.B., from the University of Liverpool in the United Kingdom, and colleagues conducted a prospective case series study to describe the appearance of EVD retinal lesions. Ophthalmological images were analyzed from 14 EVD survivors with Ebola retinal lesions. Ultra-widefield imaging revealed a total of 141 Ebola retinal lesions in 22 of 27 eyes (81 percent) of the 14 survivors. The researchers found that 29.1 percent of these lesions were accessible to optical coherence tomography (OCT). Retinal lesions were mainly non-pigmented and had a pale gray appearance. In keeping with the retinal nerve fiber ...

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    12. Optometrists investigate changes in eye structure in astronauts

      Optometrists investigate changes in eye structure in astronauts

      Astronauts who spend time aboard the International Space Station return to Earth with changes to the structure of their eyes which could impact their vision. NASA has studied the phenomenon, known as space flight-associated neuro-ocular syndrome (SANS), for several years, and now a University of Houston optometrist has quantified some of the changes using optical coherence tomography imaging, reporting his findings in JAMA Ophthalmology .

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    13. New OCT technique provides better 3-D imaging of the cellular structure of the eye

      New OCT technique provides better 3-D imaging of the cellular structure of the eye

      Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a high-resolution live imaging technique that can be used for early detection of retinal diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration , diabetes-related conditions, glaucoma or vascular occlusions, for example. However, in order to obtain cellular resolution of the retina and hence even better results, it has so far been necessary to use expensive adaptive lenses to correct the image aberrations that occur. However, using a new technique developed at MedUni Vienna, so-called Line Field OCT, MedUni Vienna researchers from the Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Technology have now managed to simplify looking into the cellular ...

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    14. New technique yields healthier blood vessels after heart surgery

      New technique yields healthier blood vessels after heart surgery

      New technique yields healthier blood vessels after heart surgery February 17, 2017 Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology have investigated the effect of a new method that involves removing tissue around the veins to be transplanted with the veins during a cardiac bypass surgery. The idea is that this leads to less damage of vessel walls during transplant.

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    15. Invasive imaging sheds more light on percutaneous coronary intervention

      Invasive imaging sheds more light on percutaneous coronary intervention

      An invasive imaging technique called optical coherence tomography (OCT) can visualize the coronary arteries in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and lead to better outcomes compared to standard angiography-guided PCI, according to new findings reported here. Results of the DOCTORS (Does Optical Coherence Tomography Optimize Results of Stenting) study were presented in a Hot Line session at ESC Congress 2016, with simultaneous publication in Circulation . In patients with non–ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS), OCT "provided useful additional information beyond that obtained by angiography alone, and impacted directly on physician decision-making," reported the study's lead investigator Nicolas ...

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    16. An implant to catch metastatic cancer cells before they grow into tumors

      An implant to catch metastatic cancer cells before they grow into tumors

      There could be a way around this, though: a special imaging method under development at Northwestern University called Inverse Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (ISOCT). ISOCT detects molecular-level differences in the way cells in the body scatter light. And when we scan our implant with ISOCT, the light scatter pattern looks different when it's full of normal cells than when cancer cells are present. In fact, the difference is apparent when even as few as 15 out of the hundreds of thousands of cells in the implant are cancer cells. There's a catch – ISOCT cannot penetrate deep into tissue ...

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    17. New technique analyses blood flow in glaucoma patients

      New technique analyses blood flow in glaucoma patients

      The link between blood flow in the retina and the development of glaucoma can now be measured accurately for the first time. This was made possible by the further development of an established measurement method, optical coherence tomography (OCT), which enables the visual assessment of the retina and has thus become an important diagnostic tool. It does not, however, provide any information about retinal function. With the support of the Austrian Science Fund FWF, a research team at the Medical University of Vienna has succeeded in making a significant improvement to the technique so that it can now also be ...

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    1-17 of 17
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