1. Articles from Newswise

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    1. New Grant Will Fund Research of Biomechanical Markers in Glaucoma

      New Grant Will Fund Research of Biomechanical Markers in Glaucoma

      Massimo A. Fazio, Ph.D., assistant professor in the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Ophthalmology , and Christopher A. Girkin M.D., have received a four-year, $2.55 million R01 grant from the National Eye Institute to explore how visual field loss developed with glaucoma is associated with individual-specific biomechanics of the eye. This new study will explore the role of biomechanical differences in the optic nerve that may explain why individuals of African descent are at greatest risk of developing glaucoma. It applies Fazio’s novel computational approaches to a large multicenter cohort of patients followed in the ...

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    2. Erasing the Line Between Imaging and Analyzing

      Erasing the Line Between Imaging and Analyzing

      As imaging and sensing technologies grow in both sophistication and accessibility, they do more than just gather data and produce images: They are research tools in their own right, providing scientists with the means to deepen our knowledge both about fundamental biological processes and about causes and progression of disease. Obtaining the images is only the first step. Significant research and clinical advances require new ways of analyzing the data. Current biomedical imaging and sensing technologies include computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, optical coherence tomography, spectroscopy, and ultrasound, to name only a few. These technologies are at the intersection of ...

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    3. Optical Coherence Topography Offers Superior Resolution In Coronary Stent Implantation, According To Study

      Optical Coherence Topography Offers Superior Resolution In Coronary Stent Implantation, According To Study

      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides safe and improved guidance for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention to treat coronary artery disease, according to results from the ILLUMIEN III: OPTIMIZE PCI trial. The trial sought to determine whether a novel OCT-based stent sizing strategy would result in a comparable or superior minimal stent area (MSA) as achieved with former stent implant imaging techniques. Researchers from NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center will present the results as part of the late-breaking clinical trials session at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) conference this weekend in Washington, D.C. The study has also been published in ...

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    4. Dr. Jennifer Sun, Investigator in the Section of Vascular Biology, Receives RPB Physician-Scientist Award from Research to Prevent Blindness

      Dr. Jennifer Sun, Investigator in the Section of Vascular Biology, Receives RPB Physician-Scientist Award from Research to Prevent Blindness

      Jennifer K. Sun, M.D., MPH, Investigator in the Section on Vascular Biology at Joslin Diabetes Center, an Ophthalmologist in Beetham Eye Institute (BEI) at Joslin Diabetes Center and Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School, has been granted an RPB Physician-Scientist Award by Research to Prevent Blindness (RPB). Dr. Sun is receiving this award for her work with noninvasive optical coherence tomography angiography to establish changes in the retinal capillary network as biomarkers that predict retinal neural damage leading to vision loss or the worsening of diabetic retinopathy over time.

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    5. Mount Sinai Health System Experts Share Skin Cancer Tips and Patient Stories for Skin Cancer Awareness Month and ...

      Mount Sinai Health System Experts Share Skin Cancer Tips and Patient Stories for Skin Cancer Awareness Month and ...

      New Skin Cancer Treatment Without Surgical Biopsy Available at Mount Sinai: Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging modality that can visualize skin structure, and has been proven useful in evaluating the degree of sun damage in skin and identifying pre-cancerous lesions. Through the use of non-ablative lasers, Mount Sinai’s Dr. Markowitz, is one of the only experts in the U.S. using the device. She has been able to successfully treat — without cutting — both early and even more advanced non-melanoma skin cancers using OCT technology. According to Dr. Markowitz, non-melanoma skin cancers are not as deadly as ...

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    6. UAB Pilot Program Brings Glaucoma Screenings Closer to Home

      UAB Pilot Program Brings Glaucoma Screenings Closer to Home

      The imaging devices, optical coherence tomography machines, provide high-resolution images of the back of the eye. An optometrist can detect the earlier stages of glaucoma in those images, even before symptoms appear. Images of a patient’s eyes are electronically transmitted from the imaging machines at the optometrist’s office to the UAB center for confirmation of the diagnosis. UAB’s trained glaucoma specialists can then confer with the optometrist on complex cases to determine an appropriate treatment regimen. Patients who undergo the glaucoma testing also receive a dilated comprehensive eye exam and educational materials about glaucoma.

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    7. High-Res Imaging Expands Vision Research of Live Birds of Prey: Study Produces First-Time Images of Retinal Structure of Hawks and Owls

      High-Res Imaging Expands Vision Research of Live Birds of Prey: Study Produces First-Time Images of Retinal Structure of Hawks and Owls
      Bird observatories all over the world may benefit from a newly designed high-resolution imaging system used to study the retinal structure of live birds of prey. In a recently published Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science article, researchers reveal unprecedented three-dimensional information about the retina of four species of raptors -- two hawks and two owls -- using the non-invasive, powerful imaging tool.
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    8. Simple Eye Test Measures Damage from Multiple Sclerosis

      Simple Eye Test Measures Damage from Multiple Sclerosis

      A quick, painless eye measurement shows promise as a way to diagnose multiple sclerosis in its very early stages, and to track the effectiveness of treatments, researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center have found in a multicenter study. “This technique has the potential to provide a powerful and reliable assessment strategy to measure structural changes in the central nervous system, both for diagnostic purposes and in clinical trials to monitor whether potential treatments can prevent deterioration or restore nerve function,” said Dr. Elliot Frohman, professor of neurology and ophthalmology, director of the Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Center at UT Southwestern and ...

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    9. Hand-Held SD-OCT Imaging Device Diagnoses Neonates with Progressive ROP Earlier, More Accurately

      Newswise — Using a hand-held spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) imaging device, researchers have obtained high-resolution retinal scans of premature infants with progressive retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), according to a report in this month’s Archives of Ophthalmology. Researchers reported the new hand-held devices eliminated many of the technical challenges involved in imaging the retina of infants and can enable shallow detachments and presumed retinoschisis to be diagnosed earlier and more accurately, significantly altering how physicians may classify and treat babies with this disease . “The SD-OCT demonstrated presumed retinoschisis extending from the temporal ridge in three premature infants. This is ...
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      Mentions: Thomas C. Lee
    10. New Optical Tool Could Produce 'Virtual Biopsies' for Brain Cancer

      New Optical Tool Could Produce 'Virtual Biopsies' for Brain Cancer
      As a Johns Hopkins electrical engineer, Jin U. Kang has spent years tinkering with lasers and optical fiber, studying what happens when light strikes matter. Now, he’s taking on a new challenge: brain surgery. More precisely, Kang is building a tool to help brain surgeons locate and get a clear look at cancerous tissue. In some cases, Kang says, this device could eliminate the need to cut into the brain for a traditional biopsy, a procedure that can pose risks to the patient. “The idea,” he says, “is to provide instant high-resolution pictures of a small segment of the ...
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    11. Researcher's Company, New Device Looks to Prevent Vision Loss in Diabetes Patients

      An Indiana University School of Optometry faculty member's company is nearing completion of a diagnostic camera that could aid in saving the vision of millions of people worldwide. Dr. Ann Elsner, director of IU's Borish Center for Ophthalmic Research, believes screening to prevent one of the most devastating aspects of diabetes – vision loss and blindness from diabetic retinopathy – could be expanded to millions of underserved people if a more affordable diagnostic camera were available. The researchers also believe there will be broader health care implications once the camera is completed since cost savings could be realized from any ...
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    12. Shining Light on Diabetes-Related Blindness

      A group of scientists in California is trying to develop a cheaper, less invasive way to spot the early stages of retinal damage from diabetic retinopathy, the leading cause of blindness in American adults, before it leads to blindness. As described in the special Interactive Science Publishing (ISP) issue of Optics Express, the Optical Society's (OSA) open-access journal, the scientists are using beams of light to measure blood flow in the back of the eye.
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    13. OSA's Interactive Science Publishing Initiative Launches with Research on Breathing Disorders and Congenital Heart Defects

      Two groups of researchers, one in the United States and one in Australia, are announcing the development of new optical techniques for visualizing the invisible processes at work in several human diseases. The published results are the first to showcase the Optical Society's (OSA) Interactive Science Publishing (ISP) initiative, which allows authors to submit a manuscript that includes large three-dimensional data and gives researchers, scientists and engineers a way to evaluate new research results more thoroughly.
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    1-14 of 14
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