1. Articles in category: Dermatology

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    1. OCT variant looks good for vascular imaging

      OCT variant looks good for vascular imaging

      Researchers in New York have shown that a variation of optical coherence tomography (OCT) is able to tell melanomas apart from other skin lesions, by imaging the patterns of blood vessels that surround them. The small, early-stage study suggests that speckle-variance (sv) OCT could become a useful clinical tool for quickly identifying the most dangerous form of skin cancer, although a larger clinical trial of the technique will be needed to prove its utility first. Writing in the open access journal Dermatology Online , Orit Markowitz and colleagues looked at two pairs of malignant and benign lesions that are typically difficult ...

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    2. Accuracy of optical coherence tomography for the diagnosis of superficial basal cell carcinoma – a prospective, consecutive, cohort study of 168 cases

      Accuracy of optical coherence tomography for the diagnosis of superficial basal cell carcinoma – a prospective, consecutive, cohort study of 168 cases

      Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs), consisting overwhelmingly of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), is the most prevalent malignancy in Western populations with large populations of Caucasians. BCC forms the majority of NMSC and its incidence continues to rise in many countries; Australia has the highest incidence rate worldwide at >1000/100,000 person-years.(1-3) Although BCC is usually not life-threatening, it represents a major public health burden. In Australia, the number of treatment episodes for NMSC is more than five times that of all other cancers combined, making them the most expensive cancers to treat.(4)

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    3. VivoSight OCT used to visualize vascular networks in melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers

      VivoSight OCT used to visualize vascular networks in melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers

      Maidstone, UK, 3rd May 2016 New results have been published in Dermatology Online demonstrating that Michelson Diagnostics’ VivoSight OCT scanner can be used to image the blood vessel networks grown by skin cancers, and showing that skin lesions could be differentiated using their characteristic vascular patterns. This new technology may become a powerful tool in the dermatologists’s toolkit for the diagnosis of skin cancer and other conditions. The paper, entitled “Speckle-variance optical coherence tomography: a novel approach to skin cancer characterization using vascular patterns” was by Dr Orit Markowitz and co-workers from SUNY Downstate Medical Center, New Your Harbor ...

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    4. Mount Sinai Health System Experts Share Skin Cancer Tips and Patient Stories for Skin Cancer Awareness Month and Melanoma Monday

      Mount Sinai Health System Experts Share Skin Cancer Tips and Patient Stories for Skin Cancer Awareness Month and Melanoma Monday

      Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States, with one in five Americans developing it over the course of their lives. It’s also one of the most preventable types of cancers. In recognition of May’s Skin Cancer Awareness Month and Melanoma Monday on May 2nd, Mount Sinai Health System experts are arming the public with vital tips on prevention and offering FREE skin cancer screenings. Experts Available for Interview • Mark G. Lebwohl , MD, Sol and Clara Kest Professor of Dermatology, Kimberly and Eric J. Waldman Professor and Chair of the Kimberly and Eric ...

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    5. Adjunct use of optical coherence tomography increases the detection of recurrent basal cell carcinoma over clinical and dermoscopic examination alone

      Adjunct use of optical coherence tomography increases the detection of recurrent basal cell carcinoma over clinical and dermoscopic examination alone

      Background Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a locally destructive form of skin cancer, mainly affecting Caucasians. In the last few years non-surgical treatments of BCC have become widely used and non-invasive methods for treatment monitoring and follow-up are therefore becoming increasingly warranted. The objective of this study was to investigate the utility of adjunct use of non-invasive optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for the detection of recurrent BCC over clinical and dermoscopic examination alone, in a real-world setting. Methods A total of 58 patients, previously treated with curettage and/or MAL-PDT for BCC, were included in the study. The patients ...

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    6. Dynamic Optical Coherence Tomography in Dermatology

      Dynamic Optical Coherence Tomography in Dermatology

      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) represents a non-invasive imaging technology, which may be applied to the diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer and which has recently been shown to improve the diagnostic accuracy of basal cell carcinoma. Technical developments of OCT continue to expand the applicability of OCT for different neoplastic and inflammatory skin diseases. Of these, dynamic OCT (D-OCT) based on speckle variance OCT is of special interest as it allows the in vivo evaluation of blood vessels and their distribution within specific lesions, providing additional functional information and consequently greater density of data. In an effort to assess the potential ...

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    7. Speckle-variance optical coherence tomography: a novel approach to skin cancer characterization using vascular patterns

      Speckle-variance optical coherence tomography: a novel approach to skin cancer characterization using vascular patterns

      Non-invasive imaging devices are currently being utilized in research and clinical settings to help visualize, characterize, anddiagnose cancers of the skin. Speckle-variance optical coherence tomography (svOCT) is one such technology that offers considerable promise for non-invasive, real time detection of skin cancers given its added ability to show changes in microvasculature. We present four early lesions of the face namely sebaceous hyperplasia, basal cell skin cancer, pigmented actinic keratosis, and malignant melanoma in situ that each display different important identification markers on svOCT. Up until now, svOCT has mainly been evaluated for lesion diagnosis using transversal (vertical) sections. Our preliminary ...

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    8. Automated spoof-detection for fingerprints using optical coherence tomography

      Automated spoof-detection for fingerprints using optical coherence tomography

      Fingerprint recognition systems are prevalent in high-security applications. As a result, the act of spoofing these systems with artificial fingerprints is of increasing concern. This research presents an automatic means for spoof-detection using optical coherence tomography (OCT). This technology is able to capture a 3D representation of the internal structure of the skin and is thus not limited to a 2D surface scan. The additional information afforded by this representation means that accurate spoof-detection can be achieved. Two features were extracted to detect the presence of (1) an additional thin layer on the surface of the skin and (2) a ...

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    9. In vivo investigation of temporal effects and drug delivery induced by transdermal microneedles with optical coherence tomography

      In vivo investigation of temporal effects and drug delivery induced by transdermal microneedles with optical coherence tomography

      Transdermal drug-delivery systems (TDDS) have been a growing field in drug delivery because of their advantages over parenteral and oral administration. Recent studies illustrate that microneedles (MNs) can effectively penetrate through the stratum corneum barrier to facilitate drug delivery. However, the temporal effects on skin and drug diffusion are difficult to investigate in vivo . In this study, we used optical coherence tomography (OCT) to observe the process by which MNs dissolve and to investigate the temporal effects on mouse skin induced by MNs, including the morphological and vascular changes. Moreover, the recovery process of the skin was observed with OCT ...

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      Mentions: Meng-Tsan Tsai
    10. Validation of a diagnostic algorithm for the discrimination of actinic keratosis from normal skin and squamous cell carcinoma by means of high-definition optical coherence tomography

      Validation of a diagnostic algorithm for the discrimination of actinic keratosis from normal skin and squamous cell carcinoma by means of high-definition optical coherence tomography

      Introduction Actinic keratoses (AKs) commonly arise on sun-damaged skin. Visible lesions are often associated with subclinical lesions on surrounding skin, giving rise to field cancerization. To avoid multiple biopsies to diagnose subclinical/early invasive lesions, there is an increasing interest in non-invasive diagnostic tools, such as high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT). We previously developed a HD-OCT based diagnostic algorithm for the discrimination of AK from squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and normal skin. The aim of this study was to test the applicability of HD-OCT for non-invasive discrimination of AK from SCC and normal skin using this algorithm. Methods Three-dimensional (3D ...

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    11. Mount Sinai Health System Experts Share Skin Cancer Tips and Patient Stories for Skin Cancer Awareness Month and ...

      Mount Sinai Health System Experts Share Skin Cancer Tips and Patient Stories for Skin Cancer Awareness Month and ...

      New Skin Cancer Treatment Without Surgical Biopsy Available at Mount Sinai: Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging modality that can visualize skin structure, and has been proven useful in evaluating the degree of sun damage in skin and identifying pre-cancerous lesions. Through the use of non-ablative lasers, Mount Sinai’s Dr. Markowitz, is one of the only experts in the U.S. using the device. She has been able to successfully treat — without cutting — both early and even more advanced non-melanoma skin cancers using OCT technology. According to Dr. Markowitz, non-melanoma skin cancers are not as deadly as ...

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    12. Rapid, noninvasive quantitation of skin disease in systemic sclerosis using optical coherence elastography

      Rapid, noninvasive quantitation of skin disease in systemic sclerosis using optical coherence elastography

      Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease that results in excessive accumulation of collagen in the skin and internal organs. Overall, SSc has a rare morbidity (276 cases per million adults in the United States), but has a 10-year survival rate of 55%. Currently, the modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS) is assessed by palpation on 17 sites on the body. However, the mRSS assessed score is subjective and may be influenced by the experience of the rheumatologists. In addition, the inherent elasticity of skin may bias the mRSS assessment in the early stage of SSc, such as oedematous. Optical ...

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    13. Effect of temperature regime and compression in OCT imaging of skin in vivo

      Effect of temperature regime and compression in OCT imaging of skin in vivo

      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a modern technique for imaging of internal structures of biotissue of up to several millimeters in depth with a resolution of several micrometers. However, various external conditions can distort the diagnostic capabilities of an OCT image. Mechanical compression and temperature regime are the two conditions which mostly affect the diagnostic OCT images obtained with a contact probe. It is shown here that the application of compression to human skin induces a decrease in contrast of the stratum corneum-epidermis junction and an increase in contrast of the epidermis-dermis junction. With regard to these junctions, a preliminary ...

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    14. Feature of the Week 03/26/2016: Longitudinal, 3D Imaging of Collagen Remodeling in Murine Hypertrophic Scars In Vivo Using Polarization-Sensitive Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

      Feature of the Week 03/26/2016: Longitudinal, 3D Imaging of Collagen Remodeling in Murine Hypertrophic Scars In Vivo Using Polarization-Sensitive Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

      This work is the result of the collaboration between the Center for Biomedical OCT Research and Translation, Center for Engineering in Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Shriners Burn Hospital, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at MGH, and Program in Dermatopathology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. The goal of this study is to develop a noninvasive, label-free technique for monitoring scars over time to facilitate studies of scar etiology and treatment. In fact, hypertrophic scars (HTS) are very commonly seen after traumatic injuries and surgery, especially in burn victims. HTS remain a major clinical challenge because of ...

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    15. Study shows VivoSight OCT is able to differentiate between actinic keratosis (AK) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) by quantification of signal intensity and layer thickness

      Study shows VivoSight OCT is able to differentiate between actinic keratosis (AK) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) by quantification of signal intensity and layer thickness

      Michelson Diagnostics, a medical device company focused on applications of multi-beam Optical Coherence Tomography (‘OCT’) technology, announces data confirming the ability for VivoSight OCT to differentiate between actinic keratosis (AK) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). This statistically significant data proves VivoSight’s capabilities as a non-invasive, objective method for diagnosing and monitoring the treatment of these diseases. Data from this study, published in The Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (JEADV) , showed statistically significant differences in the signal intensities and the epidermal thickness measurements of AK and BCC. Results also showed an excellent correlation between OCT and ...

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    16. Stanford Scientists Develop New Technique for Imaging Cells and Tissues Under the Skin

      Stanford Scientists Develop New Technique for Imaging Cells and Tissues Under the Skin

      Scientists have many tools at their disposal for looking at preserved tissue under a microscope in incredible detail, or peering into the living body at lower resolution. What they haven't had is a way to do both: create a three-dimensional real-time image of individual cells or even molecules in a living animal. Now, Stanford scientists have provided the first glimpse under the skin of a living animal, showing intricate real-time details in three dimensions of the lymph and blood vessels. The technique, called MOZART (for MOlecular imaging and characteriZation of tissue noninvasively At cellular ResoluTion), could one day allow ...

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    17. Advances in noninvasive imaging of melanoma

      Advances in noninvasive imaging of melanoma

      Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer and its incidence has risen sharply in recent decades. Early detection of disease is critical for improving patient outcomes. Any pigmented lesion that is clinically concerning must be removed by biopsy for morphologic investigation on histology. However, biopsies are invasive and can cause significant morbidity, and their accuracy in detecting melanoma may be limited by sampling error. The advent of noninvasive imaging devices has allowed for assessment of intact skin, thereby minimizing the need for biopsy; and these technologies are increasingly being used in the diagnosis and management of melanoma. Reflectance ...

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    18. Improving lateral resolution of optical coherence tomography for imaging of skins

      Improving lateral resolution of optical coherence tomography for imaging of skins

      We report on improving lateral resolution of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for imaging of skins using multiframe superresolution technique. Through introduction of suitable slight transverse positional shifts among a series of C-scans, the superresolution processing of the lateral low resolution images at each axial depth reconstructs a high resolution image. Superresolution processing of all depth layers yields a high resolution 3D image. Using known resolution photomasks, 3 times lateral resolution improvement has been confirmed for both low and high numerical aperture OCT imaging. The superresolution processed OCT 3D skin image provides much more feature details for all subsurface depth layers ...

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    19. Skin surface and sub-surface strain and deformation imaging using optical coherence tomography and digital image correlation

      Skin surface and sub-surface strain and deformation imaging using optical coherence tomography and digital image correlation

      Bio-mechanical properties of the human skin deformed by external forces at difference skin/material interfaces attract much attention in medical research. For instance, such properties are important design factors when one designs a healthcare device, i.e., the device might be applied directly at skin/device interfaces. In this paper, we investigated the bio-mechanical properties, i.e., surface strain, morphological changes of the skin layers, etc., of the human finger-pad and forearm skin as a function of applied pressure by utilizing two non-invasive techniques, i.e., optical coherence tomography (OCT) and digital image correlation (DIC). Skin deformation results of the ...

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    20. Towards multimodal detection of melanoma thickness based on optical coherence tomography and optoacoustics

      Towards multimodal detection of melanoma thickness based on optical coherence tomography and optoacoustics

      Melanoma skin cancer has one of the highest mortality rates of all types of cancer if not detected at an early stage. The survival rate is highly dependent on its penetration depth, which is commonly determined by histopathology. In this work, we aim at combining optical coherence tomography and optoacoustic as a non-invasive all-optical method to measure the penetration depth of melanoma. We present our recent achievements to setup a handheld multimodal device and also results from first in vivo measurements on healthy and cancerous skin tissue, which are compared to measurements obtained by ultrasound and histopathology.

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    21. Optical coherence elastography for human finger-pad skin deformation studies

      Optical coherence elastography for human finger-pad skin deformation studies

      An optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with an A-scan rate of 20 kHz was developed for measuring the biomechanical properties of human finger-pad skin. Such an OCT system operates at a center wavelength of 890 nm with a spectral bandwidth of 150 nm resulting in a very good axial resolution of 2.6 μm. The measured sensitivity and sensitivity roll-off of the system were ~93 dB and ~6 dB mm -1 , respectively. Elastographic B-scan images of the human finger-pad skin were constructed by using 1000 A-scans. Deformations of the human finger-pad before and after sliding, while pressed against a transparent ...

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    22. Pemphigus with features of both vulgaris and foliaceus variants localized to the nose

      Pemphigus with features of both vulgaris and foliaceus variants localized to the nose

      We report the case of a 74-year-old man affected by an unusual variant of pemphigus. He presented with a crusty and scaly lesion of the nose. We performed reflectance confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography on the lesion, which suggested an unexpected diagnosis of pemphigus. Therefore, to confirm our diagnostic suspicions, we executed indirect immunofluorescence and two biopsies, one for histopathological examination and one for direct immunofluorescence. Histopathological evaluation showed acantholysis with formation of clefts in the granular and spinous layers of the epidermis. Direct immunofluorescence revealed immunoglobulin G and C3 deposit to the full thickness of the epidermis. Indirect ...

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    23. Optical coherence tomography angiography offers comprehensive evaluation of skin optical clearing in vivo by quantifying optical properties and blood flow imaging simultaneously

      Optical coherence tomography angiography offers comprehensive evaluation of skin optical clearing in vivo by quantifying optical properties and blood flow imaging simultaneously

      Tissue optical clearing (TOC) is helpful for reducing scattering and enhancing the penetration depth of light, and shows promising potential in optimizing optical imaging performances. A mixture of fructose with PEG-400 and thiazone (FPT) is used as an optical clearing agent in mouse dorsal skin and evaluated with OCT angiography (Angio-OCT) by quantifying optical properties and blood flow imaging simultaneously. It is observed that FPT leads to an improved imaging performance for the deeper tissues. The imaging performance improvement is most likely caused by the FPT-induced dehydration of skin, and the reduction of scattering coefficient (more than ∼ 40.5 % ∼40 ...

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    24. Longitudinal, 3D Imaging of Collagen Remodeling in Murine Hypertrophic Scars In Vivo Using Polarization-Sensitive Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

      Longitudinal, 3D Imaging of Collagen Remodeling in Murine Hypertrophic Scars In Vivo Using Polarization-Sensitive Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

      Hypertrophic scars (HTS), frequently seen after traumatic injuries and surgery, remain a major clinical challenge because of the limited success of existing therapies. A significant obstacle to understanding HTS etiology is the lack of tools to monitor scar remodeling longitudinally and noninvasively. We present an in vivo, label-free technique using polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging for the 3D, longitudinal assessment of collagen remodeling in murine HTS. In this study, HTS was induced with a mechanical tension device for 4–10 days on incisional wounds and imaged up to 1 month after device removal; an excisional HTS model was also imaged ...

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