1. Articles from UH_News

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    1. Understanding congenital heart defects to prevent them

      Understanding congenital heart defects to prevent them

      To understand cardiovascular failures, the leading cause of birth defect-related deaths in infants, UH professor of biomedical engineering Kirill Larin is teaming up with Baylor College of Medicine professor of cellular and molecular physiology Irina Larina on a chicken and egg hunt. "When the heart develops, it becomes stiffer as required for ability to contract and pump blood," said Larin. "So the question is - does it become stiff because it's contracting, or is it stiff to begin with because it is genetically predefined?" Surprisingly, very little is known about an embryo's developing heart. "Defining how these mechanical factors ...

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    2. Watching an embryo's neural tube close

      Watching an embryo's neural tube close

      In those precious weeks before a woman even realizes she's pregnant, an embryo will have already developed a neural tube, a hollow structure made of cells which will eventually become the brain and spinal cord. Now, with $3.2 million from the National Institutes of Health, UH professor of biomedical engineering Kirill Larin will tackle the evolutionary anomaly of why the neural tube closes in most embryos but remains open in others, leading to birth defects such as spina bifida and anencephaly. Neural Tube Defects (NTD) are the second most common structural birth defect in humans, affecting upwards of ...

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    3. UH optometrist investigates changes in eye structure in astronauts

      UH optometrist investigates changes in eye structure in astronauts

      Astronauts who spend time aboard the International Space Station return to Earth with changes to the structure of their eyes which could impact their vision. NASA has studied the phenomenon, known as space flight-associated neuro-ocular syndrome (SANS), for several years, and now a University of Houston optometrist has quantified some of the changes using optical coherence tomography imaging, reporting his findings in JAMA Ophthalmology . "We studied pre-flight and post-flight data from 15 astronauts who had spent time aboard the space station and detected changes in morphology of the eyes," said Nimesh Patel, assistant professor. All of them had good vision ...

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    1-3 of 3
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  2. Topics in the News

    1. (3 articles) University of Houston
    2. (2 articles) National Institutes of Health
    3. (2 articles) Baylor College of Medicine
    4. (2 articles) Kirill V. Larin
    5. (1 articles) University of Maryland
    6. (1 articles) Irina V. Larina
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