1. Articles from Adelheid Woehrer

    1-11 of 11
    1. Improved accuracy of quantitative birefringence imaging by polarization sensitive OCT with simple noise correction and its application to neuroimaging

      Improved accuracy of quantitative birefringence imaging by polarization sensitive OCT with simple noise correction and its application to neuroimaging

      Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) enables three dimensional imaging of biological tissues based on the inherent contrast provided by scattering and polarization properties. In fibrous tissue such as the white matter of the brain, PS-OCT allows quantitative mapping of tissue birefringence. For the popular PS-OCT layout using a single circular input state, birefringence measurements are based on a straight-forward evaluation of phase retardation data. However, the accuracy of these measurements strongly depends on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and is prone to mapping artifacts when the SNR is low. Here we present a simple yet effective approach for improving the accuracy ...

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    2. Improved Diagnostic Imaging of Brain Tumors by Multimodal Microscopy and Deep Learning

      Improved Diagnostic Imaging of Brain Tumors by Multimodal Microscopy and Deep Learning

      Fluorescence-guided surgery is a state-of-the-art approach for intraoperative imaging during neurosurgical removal of tumor tissue. While the visualization of high-grade gliomas is reliable, lower grade glioma often lack visible fluorescence signals. Here, we present a hybrid prototype combining visible light optical coherence microscopy (OCM) and high-resolution fluorescence imaging for assessment of brain tumor samples acquired by 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) fluorescence-guided surgery. OCM provides high-resolution information of the inherent tissue scattering and absorption properties of tissue. We here explore quantitative attenuation coefficients derived from volumetric OCM intensity data and quantitative high-resolution 5-ALA fluorescence as potential biomarkers for tissue malignancy including otherwise ...

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    3. Polarization-sensitive imaging with simultaneous bright- and dark-field optical coherence tomography

      Polarization-sensitive imaging with simultaneous bright- and dark-field optical coherence tomography

      We present a polarization-sensitive (PS) extension for bright- and dark-field (BRAD) optical coherence tomography imaging. Using a few-mode fiber detection scheme, the light backscattered at different angles is separated, and the BRAD images of tissue scattering are generated. A calibration method to correct for the fiber birefringence is proposed. Since particle scattering profiles are polarization dependent, a PS detection extends the capabilities for investigating the scattering properties of biological tissues. Both phantoms consisting of different-sized microparticles and a brain tissue specimen were imaged to validate the system performance and demonstrate the complementary image contrast.

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    4. Comparison of Intensity- and Polarization-based Contrast in Amyloid-beta Plaques as Observed by Optical Coherence Tomography

      Comparison of Intensity- and Polarization-based Contrast in Amyloid-beta Plaques as Observed by Optical Coherence Tomography

      One key hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the accumulation of extracellular amyloid-beta protein in cortical regions of the brain. For a definitive diagnosis of AD, post-mortem histological analysis, including sectioning and staining of different brain regions, is required. Here, we present optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a tissue-preserving imaging modality for the visualization of amyloid-beta plaques and compare their contrast in intensity- and polarization-sensitive (PS) OCT. Human brain samples of eleven patients diagnosed with AD were imaged. Three-dimensional PS-OCT datasets were acquired and plaques were manually segmented in 500 intensity and retardation cross-sections per patient using the freely ...

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    5. Assessment of pathological features in Alzheimer’s disease brain tissue with a large field-of-view visible-light optical coherence microscope

      Assessment of pathological features in Alzheimer’s disease brain tissue with a large field-of-view visible-light optical coherence microscope

      We implemented a wide field-of-view visible-light optical coherence microscope (OCM) for investigating ex-vivo brain tissue of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and of a mouse model of AD. A submicrometer axial resolution in tissue was achieved using a broad visible light spectrum. The use of various objective lenses enabled reaching micrometer transversal resolution and the acquisition of images of microscopic brain features, such as cell structures, vessels, and white matter tracts. Amyloid-beta plaques in the range of 10 to 70  μm were visualized. Large field-of-view images of young and old mouse brain sections were imaged using an automated ...

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    6. Beyond backscattering: optical neuroimaging by BRAD

      Beyond backscattering: optical neuroimaging by BRAD

      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful technology for rapid volumetric imaging in biomedicine. The bright field imaging approach of conventional OCT systems is based on the detection of directly backscattered light, thereby waiving the wealth of information contained in the angular scattering distribution. Here we demonstrate that the unique features of few-mode fibers (FMF) enable simultaneous bright and dark field (BRAD) imaging for OCT. As backscattered light is picked up by the different modes of a FMF depending upon the angular scattering pattern, we obtain access to the directional scattering signatures of different tissues by decoupling illumination and detection ...

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    7. Visualization of neuritic plaques in Alzheimer’s disease by polarization-sensitive optical coherence microscopy

      Visualization of neuritic plaques in Alzheimer’s disease by polarization-sensitive optical coherence microscopy

      One major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is the deposition of extracellular senile plaques and vessel wall deposits composed of amyloid-beta (A β ). In AD, degeneration of neurons is preceded by the formation of A β plaques, which show different morphological forms. Most of them are birefringent owing to the parallel arrangement of amyloid fibrils. Here, we present polarization sensitive optical coherence microscopy (PS-OCM) for imaging mature neuritic A β plaques based on their birefringent properties. Formalin-fixed, post-mortem brain samples of advanced stage AD patients were investigated. In several cortical brain regions, neuritic A β plaques were successfully ...

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    8. Beyond backscattering: Optical neuroimaging by BRAD

      Beyond backscattering: Optical neuroimaging by BRAD

      Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful technology for rapid volumetric imaging in biomedicine. The bright field imaging approach of conventional OCT systems is based on the detection of directly backscattered light, thereby waiving the wealth of information contained in the angular scattering distribution. Here we demonstrate that the unique features of few-mode fibers (FMF) enable simultaneous bright and dark field (BRAD) imaging for OCT. As backscattered light is picked up by the different modes of a FMF depending upon the angular scattering pattern, we obtain access to the directional scattering signatures of different tissues by decoupling illumination and detection ...

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    9. Feature Of The Week 09/03/2017: Spectroscopic imaging with spectral domain visible light optical coherence microscopy in Alzheimer’s disease brain samples

      Feature Of The Week 09/03/2017: Spectroscopic imaging with spectral domain visible light optical coherence microscopy in Alzheimer’s disease brain samples

      A visible light spectral domain optical coherence microscopy system was developed. A high axial resolution of 0.88 μm in tissue was achieved using a broad visible light spectrum (425 – 685 nm). Healthy human brain tissue was imaged to quantify the difference between white (WM) and grey matter (GM) in intensity and attenuation. The high axial resolution enables the investigation of amyloid-beta plaques of various sizes in human brain tissue and animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). By performing a spectroscopic analysis of the OCM data, differences in the characteristics for WM, GM, and neuritic amyloid-beta plaques were found ...

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    10. Spectroscopic imaging with spectral domain visible light optical coherence microscopy in Alzheimer’s disease brain samples

      Spectroscopic imaging with spectral domain visible light optical coherence microscopy in Alzheimer’s disease brain samples

      A visible light spectral domain optical coherence microscopy system was developed. A high axial resolution of 0.88 µm in tissue was achieved using a broad visible light spectrum (425 − 685 nm). Healthy human brain tissue was imaged to quantify the difference between white (WM) and grey matter (GM) in intensity and attenuation. The high axial resolution enables the investigation of amyloid-beta plaques of various sizes in human brain tissue and animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). By performing a spectroscopic analysis of the OCM data, differences in the characteristics for WM, GM, and neuritic amyloid-beta plaques were found ...

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    11. Visible light spectral domain optical coherence microscopy system for ex vivo imaging

      Visible light spectral domain optical coherence microscopy system for ex vivo imaging

      A visible light spectral domain optical coherence microscopy system operating in the wavelength range of 450-680 nm was developed. The resulting large wavelength range of 230 nm enabled an ultrahigh axial resolution of 0.88μm in tissue. The setup consisted of a Michelson interferometer combined with a homemade spectrometer with a spectral resolution of 0.03 nm. Scanning of 1 x 1 mm 2 and 0.5 x 0.5 mm 2 areas was performed by an integrated microelectromechanical mirror. After scanning the light beam is focused onto the tissue by a commercial objective with a 10 x magnification ...

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    1-11 of 11
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    Visible light spectral domain optical coherence microscopy system for ex vivo imaging Spectroscopic imaging with spectral domain visible light optical coherence microscopy in Alzheimer’s disease brain samples Feature Of The Week 09/03/2017: Spectroscopic imaging with spectral domain visible light optical coherence microscopy in Alzheimer’s disease brain samples Beyond backscattering: Optical neuroimaging by BRAD Visualization of neuritic plaques in Alzheimer’s disease by polarization-sensitive optical coherence microscopy Assessment of pathological features in Alzheimer’s disease brain tissue with a large field-of-view visible-light optical coherence microscope Comparison of Intensity- and Polarization-based Contrast in Amyloid-beta Plaques as Observed by Optical Coherence Tomography Polarization-sensitive imaging with simultaneous bright- and dark-field optical coherence tomography Improved Diagnostic Imaging of Brain Tumors by Multimodal Microscopy and Deep Learning Improved accuracy of quantitative birefringence imaging by polarization sensitive OCT with simple noise correction and its application to neuroimaging The truth about invisible posterior vitreous structures Increased Macrophage-like Cell Density in Retinal Vein Occlusion as Characterized by en Face Optical Coherence Tomography