1. Spotting the signs: Improving resolution of systems used to image human tissue could help early identification of life-threatening diseases

    Spotting the signs: Improving resolution of systems used to image human tissue could help early identification of life-threatening diseases
    Researchers at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) have developed a new means to ensure that a screening technique using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) systems can be relied upon by clinicians so that they can accurately spot early signs of cancer. OCT is an increasingly popular method for looking beneath the surface of certain materials, notably human tissue. Although it can only be used to image tissue at depths of a few millimetres, it can produce higher-resolution images than either MRI or ultrasound, making it suitable for detecting changes in tissue structure that can indicate the early stages of cancer.
    Read Full Article

    Login to comment.

  1. Categories

    1. Applications:

      Art, Cardiology, Dentistry, Dermatology, Developmental Biology, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Microscopy, NDE/NDT, Neurology, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Other Non-Medical, Otolaryngology, Pulmonology, Urology
    2. Business News:

      Acquisition, Clinical Trials, Funding, Other Business News, Partnership, Patents
    3. Technology:

      Broadband Sources, Probes, Tunable Sources
    4. Miscellaneous:

      Jobs & Studentships, Student Theses, Textbooks
  2. Quotes

    1. NPL's phantoms and analysis have enabled us to validate our performance claims beyond doubt. We expect this validation to give OCT technology the backing it needs to become standard in hospitals around the world and thereby make an important leap in the battle against cancer.
    2. We anticipate that eventually such phantoms will be shipped with OCT systems when they are used clinically, together with a set of guidelines highlighting how they are to be used.
    3. By removing the point-spread function from the data, we have actually seen an improvement of several microns in resolution of an OCT instrument, which is very exciting. We have demonstrated that you can now resolve two points that previously couldn't be resolved.
  3. Topics Mentioned

  4. Authors